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Old 01-24-2006, 09:19 PM   #11
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Beck,

Constance mentioned the importance of pre-heating your oven. Alton Brown says that even if your oven chimes up telling you that the target temp has been reached, you must wait at least 20 minutes more before opening the door tp slide anything in.

The reason for this is that the oven chimes as soon as the air inside the oven reaches the target temp. However, once you open the door, most of the heat will escape up. Recovering that temp will take a while, especially if the item you placed is cold and large, thereby screwing up your effective bake time and temp. Now if you leave the oven untouched for the next 20 min after chiming, you will allow the mass of the oven (ceiling, walls, floor) to get good and hot, allowing faster temp recovery after you place something inside.

Hope this helps...
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Old 01-24-2006, 09:26 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chopstix
Beck,

Constance mentioned the importance of pre-heating your oven. Alton Brown says that even if your oven chimes up telling you that the target temp has been reached, you must wait at least 20 minutes more before opening the door tp slide anything in.

The reason for this is that the oven chimes as soon as the air inside the oven reaches the target temp. However, once you open the door, most of the heat will escape up. Recovering that temp will take a while, especially if the item you placed is cold and large, thereby screwing up your effective bake time and temp. Now if you leave the oven untouched for the next 20 min after chiming, you will allow the mass of the oven (ceiling, walls, floor) to get good and hot, allowing faster temp recovery after you place something inside.

Hope this helps...
that is very interesting. Logical, makes good sense :)
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Old 01-24-2006, 11:01 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Jenny
that is very interesting. Logical, makes good sense :)
Someone posted an explanation as to why you should pre-heat an oven after you hear the "ding"...basically, the oven temperature will yo-yo up and down until all surfaces have reached the temperature you set it for. The thermostat only measures the air temperature...not the temperature of the surfaces. I made some corrections to spelling and grammar for clarity...

Quote:
RE: Myth Busters - Preheating the oven

The test performed is not truely representative of what goes on when an oven is preheating. When using a graph style temperature tester you can actually see the results of preheating.

Example: If the oven is set for 350F, the oven temp will start rising and since it takes a while the bake element is glowing red hot. As the temp hits the 350F mark the thermostat turns off the power to the elements but since the element is still very hot the oven continues to heat. This is called "over-run". The temp will rise another 20 to 30 degrees.
Now the oven begins to cool off which it starts to do fairly rapidly since all the surfaces in the oven aren't really 350F yet and heat always travels to cold the oven surfaces that are absorbing the heat.
Now when the thermostat reads that the temperature has dropped to about 340 the thermostat turns the power back on to the element. It takes a little time for the element to start heating again so the oven actually loses a few more degrees before it actually starts gaining temperature. Again the temp rises to about 350 and the element switches off again and the overun only goes about 15 degrees hotter. The temp then starts to fall again taking longer this time until it drops to 340 since all the surfaces by this time have pretty much settled close to the 350 mark.
This cycling continues until the the cycle waves are only fluctuating only about 10 degrees.
On a temperature chart it looks like an intial large wave and large trough with each successive wave getting smaller and smaller until you have a very small wave that continues to stay the same size.

So preheating an oven does actually help stabilize the oven temps. But long preheats really only makes a big difference if your doing "Fine" baking. But as Linda1215 said it won't make a huge difference on Lasagna or a cassarole. Jakvis the techie
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Old 01-25-2006, 12:09 AM   #14
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Cipher, I think your text refers to electric ovens right? I don't think it applies to gas ovens.
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Old 01-25-2006, 12:18 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by Chopstix
Cipher, I think your text refers to electric ovens right? I don't think it applies to gas ovens.
Good point. For an electric oven it does apply. I'm not sure how a gas oven maintains it's temperature. If it uses a thermostat to measure the air temperature, then preheating is still required since the surfaces inside a gas oven still take time to heat up. Until the surfaces reach the set temperature, the air temps will yo-yo (though not as severely as an electric oven) as the cooler surfaces absorb heat from the hotter air.
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Old 01-25-2006, 09:51 AM   #16
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It works basically the same way in a gas oven. The major difference is that the overrun is less because the gas flame turns off and there is less residual heat in the element to continue raising the temperature.

In testing my oven, I found the same kind of over then under repeating. My goal was to get the over and the under to be equal with the average of the max. and min. being the target temp.
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