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Old 08-15-2012, 06:53 AM   #21
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Imma have to try that cookie recipe this weekend, Margi.
Thanks!
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Old 08-15-2012, 09:32 AM   #22
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The Quaker Oats web site has this recipe:

Recipes | QuakerOats.com

The Gold Medal Flour (Betty Crocker) web site has a bunch of oatmeal and oatmeal raisin cookie recipes as well.

Search Results - Betty Crocker
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Old 08-15-2012, 09:48 AM   #23
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Cws,

The recipe, I posted, was hand written by my Mom, and I do not recall having seen Quaker Oats growing up, however, I am not a big Fan of Hot or Cold Cereals.

It is possible someone gave it to her ... I thought it to be of assistance.

My daughters prepare some oatmeal cookies for the kids.

Margi.
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Old 08-15-2012, 10:04 AM   #24
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For the filling, I would use a whoopie pie filling that calls for shortening, and marshmallow cream (fluff). This should be what you are looking for. You could also look up a recipe for Twinkie filling. The high ratio shortening should be what you are looking for, it will fluff up nicely.

For me I would start with a non oatmeal cookie recipe and adapt it from there. The cookie that is in the picture looks like an all brown sugar recipe, from the color. Most oatmeal cookie recipes have a lot more oatmeal than the ones that are commercially made or found in bakeries.

It may be hard to recreate the cookie because they could be starting with a mix, this is more common in bakeries than you'd expect.
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Old 08-15-2012, 11:59 AM   #25
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Quaker Oats are probably the most popular brand of oatmeal in NA. Quaker Oats has a number of oat products:

Products | QuakerOats.com

I think most of the NA listers grew up with a round can (later cardboard) of Quaker Oats in the cupboard--either for baking or breakfast. The "can" always featured recipes. The first time I made oatmeal cookies was using either the recipe on the can or the old-fashioned one that was on the Gold Metal flour bag. Quaker Oats, saltine crackers seemed to be in everyone's cupboards at that time.

I eat oatmeal with a bit of S&P, a dab of butter. I don't consider it a breakfast cereal--I eat it at other times of the day as well. It is means of including grain and fiber in the diet.
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Old 08-15-2012, 12:25 PM   #26
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Cws,

Yes, I know what Quaker Oats are ... How can anybody not recognise the Quaker on the Tin or Box ? And they export for many years in Spain too !

It is like the Andy Warhol paintings of Campbell Soup Cans !

I have not recalled it as a breakfast food when I was very very young ... as a matter of fact, I cannot eat too much so early in morning anyway ... I am veered toward tropical fruit and dark bread with a cheese variety or Greek Yogurt ...

I have my breakfast at 11am and only an Espresso at 6.30am to 7am ... I cannot eat so early ... Have to get to Office ...

M.C.
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Old 08-15-2012, 01:01 PM   #27
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This site - Chewy Nougat (Also, Marshmallow Creme) | Boiling Sugar
gives a great recipe, with good instructions for making nougat. Nougat, if you don't know, is the stuff found in the middle of a Three Musketeers candy bar. It is soft and chewy. The recipe in the blog is for vanilla nougat. But by adding simple flavors such as almond extract, cocoa, maple, coconut, etc., you can alter it to make whatever flavor you want. You can even add fruit flavor concentrates if you so desire.

It will allow you to tweak your oatmeal cookie to whatever flavor you want.

Seeeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 08-15-2012, 01:56 PM   #28
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Sounds good ... In the Mediterranean, nougat has an ancient history, 700 to 800:

Nougat was brought to Sicilia and Alicante, Spain by the Moorish Tribes and is called Turrón in Spanish.

It comes in the original hard candy form bars and the egg yolk coarse creamy version.

Icecream in Nougat flavor is delightful.

Shall take a look at your recipe in the morning.

Ciao, M.C.
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Old 08-15-2012, 03:37 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bakechef View Post
For the filling, I would use a whoopie pie filling that calls for shortening, and marshmallow cream (fluff). This should be what you are looking for. You could also look up a recipe for Twinkie filling. The high ratio shortening should be what you are looking for, it will fluff up nicely.

For me I would start with a non oatmeal cookie recipe and adapt it from there. The cookie that is in the picture looks like an all brown sugar recipe, from the color. Most oatmeal cookie recipes have a lot more oatmeal than the ones that are commercially made or found in bakeries.

It may be hard to recreate the cookie because they could be starting with a mix, this is more common in bakeries than you'd expect.
Brown sugar cookies! What a great idea! I bet that's why mine are lighter in color than theirs. I have noticed also that they use much less oatmeal than all the recipes I've looked at. I made some today (can't get my pic to load...I'll try again later) and the texture is right but the color and taste aren't. They have something in theirs that I can't put my finger on. It's what you smell when you walk in a bakery. I have no idea what it is though. I do know they don't use a mix as a base because they advertise that they make everything from scratch with fresh ingredients.

Also my icing is way too sweet. I used high ratio shortening, powder sugar, water, vanilla, tad of almond, and some salt. I need to work on it. I wonder if they use the icing that has flour in it?? I need to try out that recipe.

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You don't live too far from this bakery. I'd be willing to mail you some cookies if you thought you could create a duplicate
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Old 08-15-2012, 04:04 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mom244now View Post
Brown sugar cookies! What a great idea! I bet that's why mine are lighter in color than theirs. I have noticed also that they use much less oatmeal than all the recipes I've looked at. I made some today (see pic below, mine is on the left) and the texture is right but the color and taste aren't. They have something in theirs that I can't put my finger on. It's what you smell when you walk in a bakery. I have no idea what it is though. I do know they don't use a mix as a base because they advertise that they make everything from scratch with fresh ingredients.

Also my icing is way too sweet. I used high ratio shortening, powder sugar, water, vanilla, tad of almond, and some salt. I need to work on it. I wonder if they use the icing that has flour in it?? I need to try out that recipe.

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You don't live too far from this bakery. I'd be willing to mail you some cookies if you thought you could create a duplicate
I wonder if they make a batter similar to pancake batter, but with yeast in it. Yeast raised waffles are fabulous, and if made with brown sugar, taste like cookies. Try this:

2 cups AP flour
1 tsp. salt
1/2 cup rolled oats
1.2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup chopped walnuts
1/2 cup chopped raisins
1 packet quick rise yeast
3 tbs melted butter
2 large eggs at room temperature
1 1/2 cups warm water (abut 105'F)

Combine water and yeast in a glass or plastic bowl and let sit for ten minutes.
Combine the remaining ingredients, except for the oil and egg, in a large bowl. When the ten minutes has elapsed, whisk together the oil and egg in a separate bowl. Add the egg/oil mixture, and the yeast to the large bowl and fold everything together to make a thick batter. Let rise for ten minutes in a warm place. Spoon onto your greased cookie sheet and bake at 350' F for 12 minutes. Remove and let cool. Sandwich the filling between cookie pairs.

If the batter is too runny, add a little more flour and gently fold it in.

The cookies should be light and fluffy, like little cakes, and sweet, but not too sweet.

I don't think it's probably exactly what you're looking for, but the primary aroma in most bakeries is sweetened yeast raised pastries. Hope this helps.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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