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Old 11-28-2007, 08:07 PM   #1
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Bacon-wrapped Pork Loin Roast...hmm

Ok... I saw a couple of recipies that gave me this idea, but I'm not sure how well this will work. Looking for input.

Planned on lightly coating the roast with mustard (possibly honey mustard), dusting with a little dried thyme, then wrapping it with bacon. Once wrapped, another coating of mustard, with some rosemary.

So, anyone have any ideas to further this endeavor? Or spot any problems with what I've got?

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Old 11-28-2007, 08:12 PM   #2
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Don't know that you need the second layer of mustard personally. Might want to sear it before roasting. Not sure about seasonings with it as I don't eat pork but otherwise it sounds good. Make sure you stick some veges in the pan with it to absorb all those juices. Yum. (well in theory of the roast aspect...)
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Old 11-28-2007, 09:47 PM   #3
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Well, I've made a "super sized" version of a bacon wrapped sausage appatizer (as an actual dish, rather than an appetizer) and that calls for the bacon to be in coated in brown sugar, but alot of the sugar winds up in the dripping pan rather than on my bacon (though there's still enough on the bacon). I was kinda wondering if the mustard would wind up in the pan rather than on the roast.

Hmm... I think I'll still double coat it... if it stays, good, if it doesn't no big loss. Though I'm gonna put the Rosemary inside with the thyme.

Hmm... perhaps if I spent a little time with a toothpick, I could insert the rosemary into the meat itself...

How about this: poke holes in the roast with a toothpick, insert rosemary. Sear the roast, then coat with mustard and thyme (maybe a little seasoned salt). Wrap in bacon, coat again with mustard, and roast.
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Old 11-28-2007, 09:53 PM   #4
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I would put some caraway seeds in with the mustard. Those two flavors work so well together, it really surprised me how well.
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Old 11-29-2007, 02:10 AM   #5
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Couldn't you use the actual woody sprigs of rosemary as the toothpick, like you do with kebabs? You could use the sprigs to hold the bacon in place.

I would still only put the mustard on the inside of the bacon, even if you doubled it. When I bake my ham, I use a honey, mustard and cranberry glaze, which I can say does not completely end up in the pan. The flavour is quite noticable in the meat. I do baste a couple of times through the cooking though. How does the unadulterated mustard bake? Does it form a mustard crust on the meat if you double coat it? I have ever only used mustard in a basting or marinating mix for roasting.
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Old 11-29-2007, 02:11 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff G. View Post
I would put some caraway seeds in with the mustard. Those two flavors work so well together, it really surprised me how well.
Never thought of that combo either.
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Old 11-29-2007, 01:16 PM   #7
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The only other time I used mustard on a roast (which was soon after joining DC) it worked pretty well. It crisped up and formed a crust, and was a noticeable flavor, but not overpowering. I'm not a big mustard fan, (in fact I rarely use it as a condiment) but as an ingredient in other things (such as that roast) it can come out fairly nice.

I would use the rosemary stems as toothpicks... but my use of fresh herbs is rare. It's not that I don't want to, is just that I seldom cook enough to use even a small bunch of herbs completely before they wind up unusable. Between that and lacking anywhere to dry them buying dried herbs is basically where I'm stuck.

I saw something on TV once, that I might try if I ever get the space and spare cash (in other words, win the lotto) called the Aero Garden... Basically allowing you to grow fresh herbs hydroponically on your countertop. Kinda like a fresh herb spice-rack.

Might pick up some caraway seeds... don't think I have those yet, and I'm slowly expanding my spice collection.
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Old 11-29-2007, 01:24 PM   #8
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Tennesee Pork Loin

Came out real good.


Honey mustard goes good on a steak too. Coat them just before they are done cooking.
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Old 11-29-2007, 01:33 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VaporTrail View Post
Ok... I saw a couple of recipies that gave me this idea, but I'm not sure how well this will work. Looking for input.

Planned on lightly coating the roast with mustard (possibly honey mustard), dusting with a little dried thyme, then wrapping it with bacon. Once wrapped, another coating of mustard, with some rosemary.

So, anyone have any ideas to further this endeavor? Or spot any problems with what I've got?
Welcome to DC, VaporTrail. Funny you should mention honey/mustard pork loin. Just watched a new show called Hot Guys That Cook, on cable, (who writes this stuff? haha); & one of the dishes was a honey/mustard pork loin - but no bacon. The dish looked great - served with cored apples and potatoes, thyme & garlic. Sure you could incorporate bacon in there somewhere. Here's a look:

Vote Now for Today's Hot Dish! - mystyle.com
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Old 11-30-2007, 03:32 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by VaporTrail View Post
I would use the rosemary stems as toothpicks... but my use of fresh herbs is rare. It's not that I don't want to, is just that I seldom cook enough to use even a small bunch of herbs completely before they wind up unusable. Between that and lacking anywhere to dry them buying dried herbs is basically where I'm stuck.
When you buy fresh herbs and can't use them all, just dry them in your oven. Put the oven on to its lowest setting until it is around that temp. Then turn it off. Wash your herbs, pat dry with kitchen paper, but a little moisture can remain, spread them over a biscuit tray or similar, stick the tray on the top shelp in your cooling oven for a few minutes and then you have some home-dried herbs without having them lying around the house.

You can also freeze several herbs to use later in dishes like soups where their appearance is not crucial. You don't need to defrost before inclusion in the dish.

You can also put leftover herbs in either vinegar or oil to give them an added zing.

Or whip them thru some softened butter for topping on a steak or for a herbed bread.

Just a few ideas to help you when you buy the herbs again.
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