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Old 05-27-2013, 09:36 AM   #1
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Virginia ham

I am going to try to make a virginia ham from a bone in fresh jam.
The meat is 8 pounds.
There is are two curing periods. The first one is done with a rub containing salt, suga and prague#1.
The 100 poud formula is 8 pounds of salt, 2 pouns of sugar ans 2 ounces of prague #1--i dont guarantee the accuracy of the prague. it's from memory..
MIX THE RUB and apply 1/2 being sure to cover the exposed bone and crevaces well. 7 days later apply the second half. age on a board in a cold area of 38 degrees for((( 1 week for each inch of the face height.
After that period the ham is soaked in cool water for 1 hour and the rub is washed off using a stiff brush.
the last stage consists of aging it for a few months at about 70 degrees. i dont have the exact info in front of me

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Old 05-27-2013, 09:52 AM   #2
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Old 05-27-2013, 11:05 AM   #3
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Do you smoke your ham or is it like an American version of Prosciutto or Parma ham?
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Old 05-27-2013, 02:32 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
Do you smoke your ham or is it like an American version of Prosciutto or Parma ham?
I will smoke it after the curing period and just before the long aging period as per the instructions I found/.

my original title for the thread did not contain the wording--- ISO/ADVICE/help/ ETC.
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Old 05-27-2013, 02:44 PM   #5
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Unless you have a designated, temp and humidity controlled place for curing, I don't know that I would try that in Florida. I wouldn't consider doing it even in my AC south Florida home. For the cost of the electricity to keep my house at that temp, I could buy several Virginia hams, already done.
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Old 05-27-2013, 04:13 PM   #6
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When we raised our own hogs, when I was young, this was done in the winter. We had raised benches in the smoke house where we buried the meat in salt. I truly don't recall how long the curing process took. We then took the meat, rinsed it off, and coated it with black pepper. It was then hung from the rafters of the smokehouse and a smoky fire was started in a pit that was built in to the concrete floor of the smokehouse. It took several days of tending the fire to get the meat properly smoked. As I say, this was in the winter time. I don't believe I would attempt it in the summer or in climates where it does not get cold enough for this process to be done properly, unless you have a controlled environment.
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Old 05-27-2013, 06:03 PM   #7
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I have a designated cheese refrigerator that has a ranco a remote temp. control. The fresh ham is now covered with the cure. I normally have this refer at 55 degrees for the cheddar that I have been aging. The cheddar has a new home and the refer is now set at the recommended 38 degrees F. for this stage.

This is a hobby not an attempt to save $$$









FROM MY ORIGINAL POST ". age on a board in a cold area of 38 degrees for((( 1 week for each inch of the face height.
"
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