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Old 03-02-2014, 09:59 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Leg of lamb is more tender than the shoulder, so it wouldn't need to cook as long, but you can still use the recipe. Add the browned meat, carrots and potatoes to the pot at the same time and they should all be done 45 minutes to an hour later.
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Old 03-04-2014, 01:08 PM   #12
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I'm saving that recipe. I had a lamb and Guiness Irish stew at an Irish pub Sunday and it was delicious.

BTW, PPO has posted this video on YouTube a couple of days ago:

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Old 03-04-2014, 04:35 PM   #13
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This looks good from the get-go and looks even better each time I look at it.
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Old 03-17-2014, 10:22 PM   #14
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A penny whistle and kazoo.

With the pot cover askew

A bit of the blarney too,

And a totally tasty Guinness Lamb Stew

I made Guinness Lamb Stew for St Patrick’s Day. I made the stew part a day ahead as recommended. This is so hard to do. I Try to follow directions.

I admit I don’t usually bother with road maps they are not designed for re-folding. See this Trans continent highway. See the Dotted Lines, that means it’s too new to determine distances yet. The road is between towns at the beginning and end of the route. Hmm, no Cloverleaf's indicated off the freeway anywhere in between. We have a full tank gas. What’s a few pot holes, I’m sure the road begins again over the next hill; oh slippery clay and rain filled chasms big enough to swallow your car-- apparently the dotted lines on the map really means they Plan to Build a Highway Someday. I guess we can camp anywhere (that’s dry) until some construction workers come along and can pull us out. Maybe in a day or two. We weren’t even married yet and for some reason she already clammering a divorce. Sheesh. Life hasn’t even begun. See this Abandoned Railroad Bed, no tracks. That means it ‘s the same as a Public Camp Ground, let’s follow the tracks in a half mile or so until we See that Old Lake through the clearing. That means we can go swimming erhm skinny dipping. We can build a fire tonight and that will surely drive the mosquitoes away. Now see that Farmer who ‘s pointing at the No Trespassing signs posted and wants you to Gett Off his property. No need to consider if he has a shot gun, he’s turning purple and are those cows or bulls. Let’s see how fast we can back up out of here that same half mile or so… See this line running through the mountains, that means there are roads and roads are meant for cars. Roads go up, over, thru and around mountains, they have Scenic Overlooks. Or, perhaps, it merely indicates its as wide as a donkey trail if you are lucky. See this road. See the river. The road continues on the other side. That means there is a bridge. What do you mean we have to Totally un pack the car and make two trips ( pay double, hot , no shade and a nagging thought my ears have heard these same encouraging words about a divorce some time in the distant past), just so your old ferry doesn’t sink. I don’t think sleeping bags, tent, clothes, a cooler, 6 months of belongings for traveling etc weighs all that much. However, this is Likely the Only way we are going to cross. See this see that. I digress. While the stew simmers, I sweat. I thought I would listen to some Sea Shanties, maybe the Clancy Bros. I got Drop Kick Murphy’s singing about a Rose Tattoo, which was fine, until I realize it is carved in blood. Not mellow enough for a slow burbling lamb stew. I settled for the Chieftains. A Rocky Road to Dublin. Nebulous title, Surprisingly energetic and mellow at the same time. You can You Tube Irish music for days…

It was a sunny day. I set the stew out on the back step to chill. With temps in the 20’s you would too.

Today, it didn’t appear there was much fat that came to the surface. Good, I guess. Better to make stew a day ahead for the flavors to develop. Have to have a wee bit o’ wearing o’ the green for St Paddy’s day. Leprechaun legs fairly danced a jig as they lept into the pot—ok, frozen baby green beans. Then the casserole goes into a slow oven until hot and bubbly Served in the pot at the table with snipped parsley for garnish.


Could not find a lamb shoulder or arm roast at my store. They had very $$ bone in chops which had way more than a considerable amount of fat & very little meat, cute little rib roasts and they were willing to divide however much of a leg I wanted. I chose Cubed Lamb Stew Meat, some of it had pretty good fatty parts and marbling. I bought 2 packages (about 2 lbs @ $15/lb). I knew there was a reason we don’t often have Lamb. Divided out some of the more uniform and lean squares to freeze and use for kebabs another time. I suppose for dinner for two, I used about 1 lbs. Used a whole bottle of Guinness Draught, and chicken broth. Added more broth at the time I added the veggies. Plenty of garlic and onion, 2 sprigs rosemary, a few sprigs thyme, 1 intact dried Thai chili pepper for adventure and a couple bay leafs for visuals. I sliced a whole bunch of green topped carrots. We like carrots. 3 med potatoes. I think the meat/ veggie ratio does not quite equate, however , we found this tasty.

After browning the meat, I looked over both shoulders, no one was looking, added an extra spoonful seasoned flour and browned that up before stirring in the liquids. Not sure If I am supposed to use warm, cold or even flat Guinness. I chose Cold. I wouldn’t want it to go bad before using. Everytime I make Stew, it looks like Soup. We prefer stew in a gravy sauce, well, I do. Thank goodness for tight fitting lids or the Luck of the Irish or a low burner on a lazy afternoon. I cooked this about 1 hour and it was smelling good, then I added the diced veggies until done. When I first lifted the cover today, it looked pretty solid. It transformed remarkably good with a lot of sauce and pretty near perfect tasting.

Well I know the recipe does not say oven bake, it was more conducive how I planned dinner to be ready for serving and it was ok to sit on top of the stove and remain hot until the rest of dinner was ready. It works.

I am too full for another helping. There is enough leftover for Lamb Pot Pies tomorrow. Now, that is the Luck of the Irish.
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Old 03-17-2014, 11:04 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Whiskadoodle View Post
I am too full for another helping. There is enough leftover for Lamb Pot Pies tomorrow. Now, that is the Luck of the Irish.
That is when you know that it was good. I think your adjustments were well thought out and sound good to me!
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Old 03-18-2014, 09:36 AM   #16
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Reference Whiskadoodles post # 14

@Whiskadoodle---- are you a relative of James Joyce?
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Old 03-18-2014, 02:43 PM   #17
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Lamb and Guinness Stew [url=http://www.flickr.com/photos/40726522@N02/12825737244/][img]https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7452/12825737244_566ffb72da_z.jpg[/img][/url] [url=http://www.flickr.com/photos/40726522@N02/12825737244/]Lamb and Guinness Stew[/url] by [url=http://www.flickr.com/people/40726522@N02/]powerplantop[/url], on Flickr 4 pounds boneless lamb shoulder 2 large onions 4 cloves of garlic 4 Tablespoons of flour 1 bottle of dark Guinness Beef or Lamb Stock 1 Sprig of Rosemary Salt & Pepper to taste 3 cups diced potatoes 2 cups diced carrots Cook the onions until they start to get some color, then remove. Season the meat with salt and pepper and dredge in flour. Working in batches Brown floured meat in the pot and add garlic, onions and beer. Deglaze the pot and return the rest of the meat to the pot. Cover and cook the meat until it is tender. (1.5 to 2 hours) Add the carrots and potatoes and cook until they are tender. (45 minutes to 1 hour) Turn off heat, cool down and put in the refrigerator overnight. Skim off excess fat and return to a simmer. Mash a few potatoes and carrots and return them to the pot. Simmer for 5 minutes and serve. 3 stars 1 reviews
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