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Old 12-13-2006, 11:30 AM   #11
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We always aimed for the neck ao we didn't mess up the body meat.
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Old 12-13-2006, 12:37 PM   #12
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Yo..CandoCook....

Neck roast are great...not one you would slice mind you..but cook until it falls off the bone(s) tender with lots of gravy! Serve with smashed taters/rice and "catface" biscuits.
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Old 12-13-2006, 12:54 PM   #13
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Really? Heck ya mean we did all that de-boning for nothing. UGH!!!!

LOL...next year the butcher does it all.
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Old 12-13-2006, 01:52 PM   #14
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The thing that WILL make venison taste bad is the fat. They eat acorns and it can be strong and does go rancid quickly. Get rid of all the sliverskin also.
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Old 12-13-2006, 02:13 PM   #15
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We did. Hours of trimming and de-fatting. : )
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Old 12-13-2006, 02:25 PM   #16
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Thanks, everybody!

My shoulder roast is almost defrosted and ready to start becoming a wonderful meal. I'll try making notes for every cut I cook, just as a reminder for the years to come.

I brought a bag full of wild juniper berries from the mountain where my dad has a cabin and was looking for a reason to use them. I didn't eat a lot of venison in my days, but I think the taste is not going to bother me (just this summer I had a wonderfull brain dish and a goulash-type of meal made with bull testicles - enjoyed them both, but not together, of course!).

I'll let you know how my dinner turns out tomorrow! Today is the day for a mellow chicken - cannot overwhelm the family!
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Old 12-13-2006, 08:13 PM   #17
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I think you will find the meat very rich tasting. Ours is not gamey, but I find I cannot eat a lot of it. The ragout I made many years ago would have made a bistro signature dish--and rich it was.
Concentrate some wine (simmer to half) and use it for part of your liquid.
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Old 12-14-2006, 09:29 AM   #18
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Unless it was a very young deer, I always boned out the carcass completely. Meat went into meal size packages, labeled "steak", "roast" or "stew".

Pieces of meat with no sinew or tendon are generally tender enough to quickly sear for a steak, or to thinly slice for stir fry. (No matter where they come from on the animal.)

Large muscles from the hind quarter or the loin were marked as "roast". High heat cooking if from a young animal, low and slow if it was one of those tough old bucks. (Give me a young doe any day--antlers don't taste good.)

Lots of tendon/sinew--either grind or cut into cubes for long, slow cooking.
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Old 12-14-2006, 10:35 AM   #19
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Here's a great recipe for the shoulder roast:

2-3 # shoulder roast boned

2 quarts water
1/2 C canning salt
1/2 cup tenderizing salt ( Morton's tenderquick)
3 T sugar
2 T Pickling spice
2 bay leaves
8 Blk peppercorns
2 cloves minced garlic

Place roast in glass or emamel pot, or plastic ziploc bag.

Combine rest of ingredients into sauce pan and bring to a boil, then allow to cool. when cooled pour over roast. Put into frigde and let it sit for 4-5 days turning meat daily.

Drain and rinse the meat. Place into a Dutch oven and cover with cold water. Heat to boiling, reduce heat to a simmer, cover and cook for 3 1/2 to 4 1/2 hours.

It's great out of the pan, and also makes great cold sandwiches. When cold it has the texture of a dried beef because it is so lean.

With the tenderloins I like to make carpaccio with them.

Happy hunting,

JDP
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Old 12-14-2006, 11:03 AM   #20
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Simple Venison Stew

A number of years ago I hunted with a gang that had a rib roast after the season was over.
This was a rather laborious process of simmering them in a "secret sauce" all day long while
consuming large quantities of adult beverages and reveling in the memories of the past hunts.
Regular BBQ sauce off the shelf would work too but the cooking was 300 degrees and
4 hours in a covered roaster with the meat submerged in sauce. And when I say submerged
I mean submerged. I tried that recipe later using a choicer cut and the results were fantastic.

Venison also lends itself well to a "beef stew" but avoid a crockpot as that tends to make
it ....I don't know ....yucky is the best term I can think of. Brown the meat in a cast iron skillet
in about 1/4 inch of oil or melted fat, after first dredging it in seasoned flour. Then in a seperate
pot add a little water, some garlic, potatoes, celery, carrots, onions, more garlic salt and
pepper and oh some more garlic. Bring to a boil. Pour a glass of red wine and reduce the
pot to a simmer. Add the browned meat with the oil it was browned in be it bacon grease,
olive oil, canola oil or what have you. Begin to simmer the mixture and let cook until the
vegetables are cooked through. If you have a wood stove go get one made out of steel before
you burn your house down. If you have a wood burning stove you can place the pot, covered
on top of the stove and let it simmer. Oh and the glass of wine you poured earlier, drink it.
You can add other vegetables if you like, for example corn, peas, lima beans, bell pepper
and even mushrooms. Season to taste and a little ground cayenne will help. Serve with fresh
biscuits as the snow blows around outside.
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