"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Soups, Stews & Casseroles > Soups
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-28-2004, 04:03 PM   #11
Senior Cook
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: USA,NewJersey
Posts: 403
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Freezer burn for a frozen liquid is really only evaporation. I don't see any reason to wash it off a frozen stock cube. When you melt it, the freezer burn is gone.
Maybe freezer burn might not be the correct term. My frozen liquids develop a layer of frost around them during prolonged freezing. This layer of frost, when thawed has absorbed the odors/flavors of the freezer and tastes horrible. The inner core tastes fine.

scott123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2004, 05:30 PM   #12
Master Chef
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
Didn't know what you were talking about when you said freezer burn, but understand now. Yes, that's happened to me, too. The answer to the absorption of odors problem is simply more and better wrap.

The answer to whether or not you boil down your stocks is simply how it tastes to you and what you're using it for. I tend to just freeze my stocks as is, then reduce them when I thaw for whatever purpose. If I'm making a light chicken soup, I just thaw and add ingredients. If I want a base for a richer dish, I thaw and reduce. If, on the other hand, when I'm through with the stock and it tastes weak, I reduce before freezing. Unlike baking, which is a lot of science, stovetop cooking tends to be more art; tasting as you go along. If when you're through your stock doesn't taste strong enough to just drink a cup of, you need to reduce no matter what.

Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2004, 11:05 PM   #13
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,018
When you freeze your stocks (or gravies) could you not just use the handy plastic "Zip Lock" tub containers? (Allowing for 15% expansion of water to ice, BTW!)

Contact to air becomes minimal, and "easily skimmed" off with water when defrosting, as would be the edges in contact with plastic, if that was an issue with some?

Neat, compact stowage, more "inside volume" than outside contact than an ice cube format would give you...?

Might be worth you guys giving it a shot and seeing how it comes out for you...

Lifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2005, 08:15 AM   #14
Head Chef
Audeo's Avatar
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Texas
Posts: 1,871
I tried the use of ice cube trays for a while (thought that was the most brilliant idea I had heard of in a while and still do!). But I tend to use a tray's worth, at least, at a time.

So I tend to revert to my "old ways" of placing a ziploc into a coffee cup and filling with gelled stock, removing as much air as possible, then storing in a heavy plastic tupperware-type container in the freezer. I tend also to use stock heavily, so I've rarely kept the stuff frozen for more than a month.
Pain is inevitable. Suffering is Optional.
Audeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2005, 07:18 PM   #15
Executive Chef
marmalady's Avatar
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,SouthCarolina
Posts: 2,642
I do both - the ice cube trays for when I want just a little stock for a 'pan sauce' for 1 or 2, and larger plastic containers for the soups and stews, and sauces with larger quantities of stock needed.

marmalady is offline   Reply With Quote


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What stock goes with what food...? jpinmaryland General Cooking 13 03-16-2005 05:35 PM
Latin corn soup w/corn stock marmalady Soups 0 09-12-2004 05:20 PM
No-fuss fresh home made stock Dianne General Cooking 1 01-05-2004 03:40 PM

» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities

Copyright 2002-2015 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:24 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.