"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Soups, Stews & Casseroles > Soups
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-11-2016, 08:30 PM   #31
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,408
Thanks for responding guys. I'm going to make it with chuck and beef broth. Probably use red wine. If I think about goulash (not this soup) it's made with beef.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2016, 06:59 PM   #32
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Tacoma
Posts: 200
I happen to own this cookbook; got it when I lived in Germany so many years ago. This is the recipe I make but don't make the dumplings. I cook spatzel (dried German product bought at commissary) and serve on the side.

This is authentic but think there are as many recipes as mom's and grandmother's that make it.

I usually use sirloin tips or quality stew meat. Chuck can be hit or miss.

https://vintagecookbooktrials.wordpr...-and-galuskas/
__________________

__________________
Lance Bushrod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2016, 07:21 PM   #33
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,419
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lance Bushrod View Post
I happen to own this cookbook; got it when I lived in Germany so many years ago. This is the recipe I make but don't make the dumplings. I cook spatzel (dried German product bought at commissary) and serve on the side.

This is authentic but think there are as many recipes as mom's and grandmother's that make it.

I usually use sirloin tips or quality stew meat. Chuck can be hit or miss.

https://vintagecookbooktrials.wordpr...-and-galuskas/
That looks pretty authentic. It's surprising to a lot of people that goulash was originally more like a stew.

As to whether to use beef, pork, or something else, it's completely up to the individual. Make it out of whatever you like. Goulash translates to "herdsman", so it could be made with any type of herded animal (I'm not sure pigs are herded, but there ya go). There are many, many variations made by families in eastern Europe.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2016, 12:21 AM   #34
Head Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,054
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
That looks pretty authentic. It's surprising to a lot of people that goulash was originally more like a stew.

As to whether to use beef, pork, or something else, it's completely up to the individual. Make it out of whatever you like. Goulash translates to "herdsman", so it could be made with any type of herded animal (I'm not sure pigs are herded, but there ya go). There are many, many variations made by families in eastern Europe.
It would probably be pretty good with mutton. I may pass this on to my friends in the Bahamas who make dishes with goat regularly (it's listed as mutton on the menu). I think it would be a hit at their restaurant.
__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2016, 04:15 AM   #35
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,894
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
So the Sámi version would use reindeer meat.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2016, 08:58 PM   #36
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,408
I made this soup tonight using pork and chicken broth. DELICIOUS!!

As it was cooking, SO suggested I should have made a half recipe in case we don't like it. I'm glad I didn't because we both liked it a lot!

Thank you Steve and thank you to your great aunt.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
pork, recipe, soup

Hungarian Goulash Soup Although I believe the recipe has its origins in Hungary, this version was passed along to me by my great aunt, who was Czech. I’ve made a few modifications over the years, mostly driven by the increasing availability of what were once hard-to-find ingredients. I usually use pork to make it, but you can really use any combination of stew meat and vegetables. This is also one of those dishes that benefits from making up ahead and allowing to sit overnight in the fridge. [B]Ingredients[/B] [LIST] [*]3 lbs pork loin or shoulder, or beef chuck roast, trimmed and cut into 1” cubes [*]2 tsp salt [*]5 or 6 garlic cloves, minced [*]4 slices thick bacon, cut into ½” pieces [*]2 onions, chopped [*]½ cup dry white wine [*]4 cups low sodium chicken stock [*]2 tomatoes, diced (or one 14.5 oz can diced tomatoes) [*]½ head cabbage, cut into 1” pieces [*]2 tsp caraway seed, toasted and ground [*]3 tbsp good quality paprika (I use 1 tbsp Hungarian Sweet for flavor, 1 tbsp Hungarian Half Sharp for heat, and 1 tbsp Smoked Spanish for smokiness) [*]2 tsp marjoram [*]1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce [*]1 tbsp salt, or to taste [*]Fresh ground black pepper to taste [*]¼ cup vinegar [*]Sour cream for serving [/LIST] [B]Method[/B] [LIST=1] [*]Mix meat cubes with 2 tsp salt and minced garlic. Allow to marinate for at least an hour, and up to four hours. [*]Cook bacon in a Dutch oven over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until bacon is browned and fat is rendered. With a slotted spoon, remove the bacon and set to the side, leaving the fat behind in the pot. If there is less than 3 tablespoons of fat remaining, add enough butter to make up the difference. [*]Increase heat to medium high, brown the meat in batches, ensuring that it’s not overly crowded in the pan. As each batch is finished browning, remove and set aside. [*]After the meat is all browned, add the onions to the pot and cook for 10 minutes, or until golden brown. Add the white wine to deglaze the pot, stirring to release the browned bits. Bring to a boil and cook for 5 minutes to burn off the alcohol. [*]Return the meat and bacon to the pot. Add the chicken stock, tomatoes, cabbage, ground caraway seed, paprika, marjoram, and Worcestershire sauce. Season to taste with salt and pepper. [*]Bring to a boil. Cover the pot, turn heat to low and allow to simmer for 45-60, or until meat is fork tender. [*]Add the vinegar and cook for another couple minutes. [*]Ladle into soup bowls and serve with a dollop of sour cream on top. [/LIST] [IMG]http://i892.photobucket.com/albums/ac125/SteveKroll/20151124_150111.jpg[/IMG] 3 stars 1 reviews
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:41 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.