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Old 09-11-2005, 12:23 PM   #1
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What are the best noodles for a soup so that they don't get soggy?

I've tried making chicken noodle soup a couple of times and when I eat it fresh it is fine. However, one of the major reasons I make it is to take it to work with me for lunch and every time, when it is time to eat it, the noodles are all soggy. I've only tried storebought egg noodles but I've tried adding only uncooked noodles, adding them as I am separating portions and putting them in the refrigerator, and even waiting until the soup has completely cooled to add the uncooked noodles. None of it has worked.

Any suggestions?

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Old 09-11-2005, 12:27 PM   #2
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Cook the noodles separately. Then you heat the soup up for lunch and add the cooked noodles to the hot soup.

When cooking the noodles, drain and rinse with cold water then toss with a little oil or butter to coat them and prevent sticking. Then package them in appropriate amounts in plastic bags to go with portions of noodle-less soup for taking to work.
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Old 09-11-2005, 12:44 PM   #3
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Yea, that would probably work just fine, but I'm also interested in what noodles would hold up better. For instance, in Campbell's Chunky Chicken noodle soup, the noodles sit in the soup the whole time and when I go to eat it the noodles are still firm.
Thank you for the suggestion, that is probably what I will use.
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Old 09-11-2005, 02:17 PM   #4
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I don't think the shape of the noodle makes that much of a difference. Choose what you like.
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Old 09-11-2005, 02:55 PM   #5
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I always bought the frozen egg noodles, that cook up big, dense, and thick. They will hold up, but at the same time, they will also soak up most of the liquid when the soup cools.

Andy has the best solution. Cook the noodle separate, and add them after you reheat it. That's how we do it at the club I work, as we make about 3 - 4 gallons of chicken soup at a time, and add the cooked noodles right before it goes out.
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Old 09-11-2005, 04:16 PM   #6
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I keep my noodles separate too. They warm so quickly that the broth is usually enough poured over them...but if in doubt..I just microwave it 30 seconds.

We do the same with our house soup which is "Broccoli and Cheese". We keep the broccoli separate. Keeps the whole pan from turning that "greenish-orange" color.
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Old 09-11-2005, 05:35 PM   #7
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If I read the OP correctly, he wants advice on how Campbell's tinned (? not sure if they package it in other ways!) soups can have noodles which have been part of the canning process and then heated up and STILL stay firm

My answer is that they probably have noodles specially made to withstand long immersion in the liquid....??
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Old 09-11-2005, 07:01 PM   #8
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I use the No Yolk brand egg noodle I add it at the last 10 minutes of cooking and it holds up well even the next few days for left overs.
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Old 09-11-2005, 11:09 PM   #9
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Andy M beat me to it - do exactly what he said - the key is to rinse in cold water to stop the cooking process - then add as needed.
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Old 10-14-2005, 11:09 PM   #10
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I also cook the noodles separately and then add when heating the soup up. This works well with rice, too - then it doesn't start to get "feathery".

I also agree that rinsing makes all the difference, it also removes access starch that will enhance the thickening and shorten the lifespan of your soup.

If you're worried about how to use up the noodles that don't go into your soup - use them for a pasta as well.

I do believe that the canned soups with noodles in the grocery stores are "enhanced" somewhat. lots of ingredients that end with ..."ates" 'n stuff! Also I would imagine that there is more egg or something comparable in them than flour.

...........I think!
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