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Old 07-17-2015, 01:22 PM   #11
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Just my personal preferences - Russets for soups, stews, and good ol' baked, Yukon golds for mashed, and reds for potato salad.
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Old 07-18-2015, 01:27 PM   #12
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Whenever I'm faced with this sort of question I always ask "what type/s of potatoes were used when the first vichyssoise/s were created.
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Old 07-18-2015, 01:49 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
Whenever I'm faced with this sort of question I always ask "what type/s of potatoes were used when the first vichyssoise/s were created.

How would you know the answer to that question?
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Old 07-19-2015, 08:14 AM   #14
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How would you know the answer to that question?
Research old French recipes. They exist going back as far back as Carmen,

'Larousse' has an old recipe for potato and leek soup.
Goggle the type of potatoes the French had access to in the markets like Le Halles.
This information isn't hard to find. Bintje, Belle de Fontenay, Sterling, Viola, Ratte, Roseval and Rosa to name a few. The latter two being very popular.
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Old 07-19-2015, 11:00 AM   #15
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What was available in the French country-side a couple of hundred years ago, while interesting, may not be relevant. Among the potato types generally available at my supermarket, I choose russets as they have a creamier texture in the soup. YMMV
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Old 07-20-2015, 09:34 AM   #16
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I know russets are used a lot as are other potato varieties.
I just enjoy trying to make food from the most original recipes if I can find them. It's one of my retirement hobbies.
Like today I'm making a gastrique for a leg of lamb.
I've been scouring my Larousse and Escoffier books for old recipes.
Just having fun with food.
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Old 07-20-2015, 09:39 AM   #17
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That sound interesting. Do you then cook a modern version of the recipe to compare?
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Old 07-20-2015, 10:30 AM   #18
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That sound interesting. Do you then cook a modern version of the recipe to compare?
Ya I've done that. Take flour for instance. The flour that was milled from the type of wheat they grew a hundred years ago in C. France was very different than our AP flour today.
I know a french baker who imports his flour from a small mill in rural France b/c he claims it's a "poorer quality" than Canadian flour and therefore it makes for a "better baguette".
I bought a couple of pounds of the French milled flour and tried it in a classic roux. (I follow Escoffier's recipe for making a roux: 6 parts flour to 5 parts clarified butter.) At the same time I made a roux from AP flour.
The French roux produced a slightly heavier denser sauce even though I used the exact same amounts of liquid (to the gram). It took more whisking to incorporate the hot chicken stock.
I could taste somewhat of a difference but I couldn't explain the specific difference. Just more 'earthy' maybe?
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