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Old 06-09-2014, 06:53 AM   #11
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Far as I can tell, the only difference between this and a more traditional chili is that it has no tomato, the the beef has been replaced with fish.

I mean, some put pork in their chili. Others throw in chicken. Still others use venison. The only commonality between them is the chili peppers. And I put chili peppers in this. So I'm calling it chili, not matter what you all say.

I have to confess though, I like beef in my chili more than I do fish. This was tasty, but not as tasty.

Besides, I'm fully aware that not every experiment I try is going to make something amazingly tasty. But unless you're willing to try something new, how are you ever going to learn new things? And really, this was pretty good. But you have to enjoy fish.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 06-09-2014, 07:04 AM   #12
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Most chilis that I make have no tomato in them. Steve has a nice chili combo there, but I would probably add some arbol along with them.

No fish for me either.
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Old 06-10-2014, 05:27 PM   #13
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Well it looks like chili to me and that's what I'll call it

Chief I love fish but aside from salmon I'm only knowledgeable about the fish I love. And those are the ones I catch myself. Nothing beats fresh fish. Rock, Perch, Bluefish are where my experience lies.

Sadly I haven't been fishing in years. Time and/or money has prevented it.
I saw some Cod in the store the other day. Ya think that would fit your criteria for firm and mild?

I'm a chili head and this will be just 1 more on the list of chilies I've tried.
I agree that if you're not willing to try new ideas you'll never learn new things.

Beans no beans. Tomato no tomato. That's all just snob appeal to me. If it tastes good then it's a winner. As I've said before. You ask 100 chiefs for there best chili recipe you'll get 101 answers. I'll put fish in my chili and if it's tasty I'll be the first to say Chief Longwind Of The North gave me the recipe.

That being said if it tastes like something I scraped off the bottom of my shoe I'll be the first to say Chief Longwind Of The North gave me the recipe.
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Old 06-10-2014, 07:17 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Zagut View Post
Well it looks like chili to me and that's what I'll call it

Chief I love fish but aside from salmon I'm only knowledgeable about the fish I love. And those are the ones I catch myself. Nothing beats fresh fish. Rock, Perch, Bluefish are where my experience lies.

Sadly I haven't been fishing in years. Time and/or money has prevented it.
I saw some Cod in the store the other day. Ya think that would fit your criteria for firm and mild?

I'm a chili head and this will be just 1 more on the list of chilies I've tried.
I agree that if you're not willing to try new ideas you'll never learn new things.

Beans no beans. Tomato no tomato. That's all just snob appeal to me. If it tastes good then it's a winner. As I've said before. You ask 100 chiefs for there best chili recipe you'll get 101 answers. I'll put fish in my chili and if it's tasty I'll be the first to say Chief Longwind Of The North gave me the recipe.

That being said if it tastes like something I scraped off the bottom of my shoe I'll be the first to say Chief Longwind Of The North gave me the recipe.
Yes, cod would work. Go ahead and use my name. I live to experiment, and to share. Hope ya like it.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 06-11-2014, 12:47 PM   #15
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How many beans does it take to make good chili? 239. One more bean would make it "two forty."
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Old 06-11-2014, 01:51 PM   #16
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How many beans does it take to make good chili? 239. One more bean would make it "two forty."
That would be none.
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Old 06-11-2014, 02:23 PM   #17
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Technically, chili is sauted meat in a spicy sauce. No beans. That's why I keep telling vegetarians that meatless chili is a spicy sauce.

If you want beans, you pour the chili OVER the beans.
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Old 06-11-2014, 02:27 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
Technically, chili is sauted meat in a spicy sauce. No beans. That's why I keep telling vegetarians that meatless chili is a spicy sauce.

If you want beans, you pour the chili OVER the beans.
Yes, but the spice in the sauce must come from dried or fresh chilis.
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Old 06-12-2014, 12:23 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
Technically, chili is sauted meat in a spicy sauce. No beans. That's why I keep telling vegetarians that meatless chili is a spicy sauce.

If you want beans, you pour the chili OVER the beans.
Technically "Chili" is a pepper? Right?
I am asking.
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Old 06-12-2014, 01:18 PM   #20
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Technically "Chili" is a pepper? Right?
I am asking.
Actually, chile is a pepper. Chili is a food dish; ingredients and methods vary greatly

Really, actually, though, it's a dispute without end and depends on where you live: Chili or Chile? Dispute Never Seems to Cool Off - Los Angeles Times
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beans, chili, heat, recipe

For Chili Heads Only Ok kids, this chili will seperate the chili heads from normal people. DW is down sick and has to eat easily digestible foods, including jello water. That left an opening for me to play. My chili came out pretty tasty, and probably not like any chili recipe you've tasted. Warning, this is really hot. Ingredients: 2 Pollock Fillets 1 yellow onion 1 celery stalk. 1 pat butter (about a tsp.) Salt Pepper grinder pepper 1/4 tsp. ground cumin 1/4 tsp. ground coriander 1 tbs. hot chili powder 1 fully ripe, fresh ghost pepper 1 tbs, Sriracha Pepper Sauce 1/2 tsp. Tabasco Sauce, original flavor 15 oz. can pinto beans 15 oz. can black beans Wash and slice the celery. Peel the onion, slice it in half through its equator. Slice each half into quarters. Heat the butter in a 3 quart sauce pan until it begins to bubble. Add the celery and onion. Season with salt. Remember to season each layer with a little salt and pepper. When the veggies are just starting to soften, and the fish cubes. Cover and let the food simmer for 5 minutes. Add the herbs and spices, and stir them in. Add both the pinto and black beans. Fold the pot ingredients together. Taste and correct the seasonings. Add the Sriracha and Tabasco sauces. Finally, use kitchen shears to finely cut the ghost pepper into the chili. Cover and simmer for 30 minutes. Serve with whatever you like with chili. And the fish flavor works very well in this chili. Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North 3 stars 1 reviews
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