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Old 08-15-2005, 04:29 AM   #21
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From http://www.wordreference.com/

picante

Iadjetivo
1 (comida) hot, spicy
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From http://education.yahoo.com/reference/dict_en_es/

Picante

(Spanish)


piĚcanĚte
adj.
1. - spicy
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From http://www.tomisimo.org/
Spanish Word, Phrase or Translation

picante

English Word, Phrase or Translation

spicy
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From http://www.yourdictionary.com/

picante adj. : 1. highlyseasoned adj. 2. racy adj. 3. piquant adj. 4. biting adj. 5. spicy adj. 6. hot adj. (spicy) 7. peppery adj. 8. pungent adj. 9. itchy adj.
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Old 08-15-2005, 07:36 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daphne duLibre
""soup" -- which for me is anything in a pot that gets heated on a burner and contains any amount of water.
OK so based on this definition it sounds like you would call things like rice, beans, couscous, Stovetop stuffing, braised dishes, pastas, and many other things soup. Do I understand you correctly?

Also, I asked you before, but I don't think you ever answered me...What does *G* mean? You have that in a lot of your posts. I am guessing it is a grin or something like that, but I have never seen anyone other than you use that so I don't know what it means.
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Old 08-15-2005, 10:58 AM   #23
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Chili, like many a chowder, can be defined by its regional differences. Some are quite simple, with few ingredients, as crossing the great wide west prohibited most fresh items and wide variety. That discussion aside, I view chili as a creation. Let's see what I will do with it this time. DO I have all day? or will this be a crock pot meal because I'm working? Will I re-create a regional recipe, or go it solo?

My experience is if you use good basic ingedients and start with a sofrito base, you can't go too far wrong. (ok ok ok ...chocolate mango sardine chili might be a little much! lol)
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Old 08-15-2005, 11:05 AM   #24
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I see chili as its own category since there are so many different types of chili. Just as stew is its own category and there are tons of different types of stew. You can have chili that has beef, chili that is vegetarian, chili that has beans or chili without. It can be spicy or not. It can have chicken, turkey, or any other number of meats. It can be red or white or even other colors. Yes chili is a dish, but it is also a category as far as I am concerned.
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Old 08-15-2005, 11:09 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robo410
(ok ok ok ...chocolate mango sardine chili might be a little much! lol)
Geez, I guess you won't be invited to dinner tonight!

(just reading it about made me gag!!!!!!)
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Old 08-15-2005, 11:14 AM   #26
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I didn't see it mentioned here, but sometimes if my chili is a bit more watery than I like, I add some refried beans to reach the consistency I want. As I feel like we need the beans more than we need the meat, I also use pinto or kidney beans in the chili. I like it made with black beans also, but haven't made it myself that way. If I'm cooking black beans, I ususally use the recipe from the Columbia restaurant. If anyone would like the recipe, I'll be happy to post it in the soup forum.
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Old 08-15-2005, 11:36 AM   #27
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yes, pretty please! Would love to see the recipe!
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Old 08-15-2005, 11:39 AM   #28
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licia, if it is a chili, post it in the chili forum. Don't worry about how runny it is. If we want to move a copy to Soups we can do that quite easily too.
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Old 08-15-2005, 11:40 AM   #29
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I've always used masa flour to help with the thickness. The refried beans is an excellent idea!!!!

Looking forward to seeing that recipe!
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Old 08-15-2005, 11:47 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
Acid is not needed for deglazing a pan. Deglazing can be done with plain water. Acid is also not basic to brining. For a basic brine all you need is water and salt.
Not to change the subject but GB - when I burn stuff onto any pan I will quicken cleanup time by deglazing with water when I'm done cooking - it's much better than soaking!!!!!!!!
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