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Old 04-20-2015, 08:06 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
We experienced the same thing with rosemary and quit trying. We do, however, have a thyme plant in the garden that's been there for years and keeps producing thyme for the kitchen.
My creeping thyme, a groundcover, does well and has pretty pink flowers. It just doesn't have much flavor.
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Old 04-20-2015, 08:23 PM   #22
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Rosemary is indeed a heartbreaker. It's not hardy to my area. I dig mine up, repot it, take it inside and give it bunches of TLC, and it rewards me by shedding its needles all over the floor. So, like thyme, I get a new rosemary every year. Haven't tried growing bay yet, but if it acts like that, I probably won't.
Rosemary is prolific in these parts Dawg. Because it's drought tolerant, large bushes of it are often planted in highway landscaping here. I don't care very much for the flavor, but the scent is really nice.
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Old 04-20-2015, 08:36 PM   #23
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Rosemary is prolific in these parts Dawg. Because it's drought tolerant, large bushes of it are often planted in highway landscaping here. I don't care very much for the flavor, but the scent is really nice.
Kay, the advantages of living in a warmer climate! They're just not hardy here.

I got the most gorgeous rosemary shrub from a friend in the greenhouse business. It smelled fantastic, almost lemony, and I loved brushing my hands along it every time I passed it. Like no other rosemary I ever had. Overwintered it, babycaked it, and of course it croaked.
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Old 04-20-2015, 08:57 PM   #24
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I really thought i had a shot with mine this year. It grew so much this year and seamed so healthy. In my eyes, I did everything right. But clearly, the plant didn't agree. I got it at about 8 inches high with a few sorry looking branches, and by the end of the summer, it looked like a shrub.
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Old 04-20-2015, 09:31 PM   #25
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Sage + thyme = poultry seasoning

And here's a yummy recipe that uses a fair amount of sage: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/m...lo-recipe.html

I'm lucky that my area is great for growing herbs, except cilantro. It bolts too quickly to be worthwhile.
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Old 04-20-2015, 09:42 PM   #26
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Kay, the advantages of living in a warmer climate! They're just not hardy here.

I got the most gorgeous rosemary shrub from a friend in the greenhouse business. It smelled fantastic, almost lemony, and I loved brushing my hands along it every time I passed it. Like no other rosemary I ever had. Overwintered it, babycaked it, and of course it croaked.
A couple of years ago I had a rosemary bush shaped and pruned like a Christmas tree beside my sink in the kitchen. Loved the lemon/pine smell and look of it, all decorated in tiny cookie cutters.
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Old 04-20-2015, 09:53 PM   #27
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Sage + thyme = poultry seasoning

And here's a yummy recipe that uses a fair amount of sage: Chicken "Saltimbocca": Saltimbocca di Pollo Recipe : Mario Batali : Food Network

I'm lucky that my area is great for growing herbs, except cilantro. It bolts too quickly to be worthwhile.
That recipe sounds delicious GG!

Speaking of cilantro, it bolts way too fast for me too. I gave up when we found big bunches of it at the Mexican market for 25 cents.
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Old 04-21-2015, 01:39 AM   #28
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FWIW, I've never used sage in an Italian red sauce. I like it with poultry, and it's good for a change when cooking pork. As many times as I've seen/heard references to brown butter with sage I never remember to make it those rare times I have fresh sage in the house.


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, yeah, its just strange that some people feel the need to try and impress people by talking about things they don't know about....
And yet, politicians do that every day...
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Old 04-21-2015, 03:00 AM   #29
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ONE PAN SAGE AND ONION CHICKEN AND SAUSAGE | Recipes | Nigella Lawson
Jamie Oliver - Magazine

I have tried these recipes , a good use of sage . When I make a fresh tomato sauce I tend to use oregano and thyme from the garden , I don't see why you couldn't add a bit of sage too .
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Old 04-21-2015, 09:58 AM   #30
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There are several kinds of sage. Some have very strong sage flavor and some not so strong.
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