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Old 03-31-2014, 09:31 AM   #51
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I have several items of cast iron all are well seasoned from use except for an odd sized one. I used it the other day and was in a rush and overheated it with a heavy coating of oil. I put it in a cold oven to cool. Now the entire thing is super gummy. How do I remove the residue??
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Old 03-31-2014, 01:43 PM   #52
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Try heating it again and then wiping out (carefully) the excess while it is still hottish.
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Old 03-31-2014, 03:49 PM   #53
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lemme guess... that was vegetable oil of some type?

'seasoning' is the process of developing a carbon coating on the cast iron that becomes 'non-stick'

if you review the preceding pages you'll see why some oils/fats seem to work better than others. there is actual science behind this stuff, although "Because my Grandmother did it like this" trumps science every time.

I just cook fatty proteins like patty sausage and bacon in the pan until it gets slick. yup, because that's how my . . .
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Old 03-31-2014, 05:49 PM   #54
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Not cast iron, but carbon steel for this technique. You season it the same way, and for the same reasons. I do this in my Atlas, flat-bottomed wok.

Melt butter in it. Clarify the butter, add uncooked popcorn, cover, and heat over medium high until the popcorn is done. Remove from heat. Eat the pop corn. Wipe out the wok with paper towel, store.

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Old 03-31-2014, 06:10 PM   #55
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I too am skeptical about the electrolysis, wire wheel and lye.

Starting with lye, it won't react with the iron at all. What it will do is react with any oils, turning them into soap. I see no reason to do this.

As far as electrolysis all that's going to do is remove material from your pan, just eating it away. I never heard of anybody doing that.

A wire wheel seems to heavy handed to me. Some of that patina you are removing might be good patina.

My advice would be to remove any rust with steel wool. Then run it through a few season, bake, season, bake cycles. I'd bake at (guessing) 250-300F for 30 minutes per cycle. Use a high temperature smoke point oil. Avocado oil has the highest smoke point of them all.

I've never heard of anybody destroying a cast iron pan, except maybe by leaving it out in the weather for several decades.
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Old 03-31-2014, 07:51 PM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Who Cooks View Post
I've never heard of anybody destroying a cast iron pan, except maybe by leaving it out in the weather for several decades.
Oh they can be destroyed. Think thermal shock. Granted, it is very hard to destroy one, but it can happen.
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Old 04-01-2014, 12:03 AM   #57
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Lordy ! It's simple

Hot soapy water ( dish soap/detergent ) scrubby/scrungie

Done
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Old 04-01-2014, 01:53 AM   #58
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I'm going to be going back to page one and reading this thread with great interest.

I have an old CI skillet that I got as a freebie at an estate sale about 15 years ago. The lovely lady who gave it to me wasn't sure how old it was. I can barely read on the underside that it is a Griswold - I can only make out the G and the D, and they are in a large cross shaped logo. It's an 11" skillet and heavy as all get out. It's been somewhat neglected, the cooking area is in fairly good shape but the outside of the skillet is bumpy from crud buildup.

I would love to clean it up and use it again. I think I'll buy one of those steel scrubbers to use on the outside and once that's done, I hope to re-season it and use it.

Thank you to all for your advice on cleaning up these wonderful old CI skillets. I'll read through this thread again and hopefully will get this wonderful old skillet going again.
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Old 04-01-2014, 08:04 AM   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheryl J View Post
I'm going to be going back to page one and reading this thread with great interest.

I have an old CI skillet that I got as a freebie at an estate sale about 15 years ago. The lovely lady who gave it to me wasn't sure how old it was. I can barely read on the underside that it is a Griswold - I can only make out the G and the D, and they are in a large cross shaped logo. It's an 11" skillet and heavy as all get out. It's been somewhat neglected, the cooking area is in fairly good shape but the outside of the skillet is bumpy from crud buildup.

I would love to clean it up and use it again. I think I'll buy one of those steel scrubbers to use on the outside and once that's done, I hope to re-season it and use it.

Thank you to all for your advice on cleaning up these wonderful old CI skillets. I'll read through this thread again and hopefully will get this wonderful old skillet going again.
Cheryl; Here's an easy way to get rid of the crud. Purchase some ammonia and put it into a glass or plastic bowl. Place the pan and the bowl in a large, plastic garbage bag. Do this in the garage, or a shed as ammonia doesn't smell very good. Close the bag and let it sit overnight. The next day, the crud simply wipes off with a paper towel. This also works for cleaning oven grates. They come out shiny, like new.

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Old 04-01-2014, 09:54 AM   #60
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Using ammonia will remove the seasoning from the entire pan! If the cooking surface is good, and you only want to clean the exterior, an abrasive such as steel wool or similar may be the way to go. There is no sense in disturbing a perfectly good decades old cooking surface.
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