"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-02-2017, 10:46 AM   #11
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 42,882
I'm interested in hearing your results. Let us know what differences you see.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2017, 11:19 AM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 19,658
Me, too, although I think I'll just end up using my beeswax for candles. If it ain't broke...
__________________

__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2017, 11:15 PM   #13
Head Chef
 
Skittle68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 890
Well, I haven't used them yet but they sure are smooth and shiny!! 
Name:   ImageUploadedByDiscuss Cooking1483416860.599803.jpg
Views: 100
Size:  14.1 KB

Name:   ImageUploadedByDiscuss Cooking1483416887.121716.jpg
Views: 97
Size:  12.7 KB
Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByDiscuss Cooking1483416913.496514.jpg
Views:	29
Size:	39.3 KB
ID:	25955


Sent from my iPhone using Discuss Cooking
__________________
Skittle68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2017, 11:20 PM   #14
Head Chef
 
Skittle68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 890
It ended up being like chopstick consistency. I used popsicle molds now I basically have something like the sticks they sell online.

I warmed up the pans a little to make sure I was getting a nice thin coating, and it was like the consistency of honey.

Just by the feel of it I can see why people say it's more durable and water resistant, but we will see.


Sent from my iPhone using Discuss Cooking
__________________
Skittle68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2017, 09:50 AM   #15
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,668
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skittle68 View Post
Just by the feel of it I can see why people say it's more durable and water resistant, but we will see.

Is that because its coated with wax?

Cast iron is already durable and water resistant. What you need for seasoning is polymerization and carbonization -- this keeps the food from sticking.

I'm not sure you get that with wax, but you do get that with fat.

Wax will prevent rust though (as does oil, but oil can go rancid)
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2017, 01:22 PM   #16
Head Chef
 
Skittle68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 890
The wax burns off just like the oil. What you have left is no longer wax.

Different types of fat provide slightly different properties in seasoning, and since wax is similar to fat in composition it stands to reason it could provide different properties as well. My initial observation is "hard, smooth, and shiny." Whether it is any different in performance I do not know yet. If you're interested I'll keep you posted though


Sent from my iPhone using Discuss Cooking
__________________
Skittle68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2017, 05:04 PM   #17
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 19,658
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skittle68 View Post
The wax burns off just like the oil. What you have left is no longer wax.

Different types of fat provide slightly different properties in seasoning, and since wax is similar to fat in composition it stands to reason it could provide different properties as well. My initial observation is "hard, smooth, and shiny." Whether it is any different in performance I do not know yet. If you're interested I'll keep you posted though
Hm. I've never heard that wax is similar to fat. I just felt the beeswax we collected from our hives last year and it's not slippery or greasy at all. Fat does not burn off as it seasons a pan; the heat changes it to a substance that bonds with the iron, creating a non-stick barrier between the iron and the food.

I'd be interested in how the beeswax holds up. Please keep us posted.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2017, 06:26 PM   #18
Head Chef
 
Skittle68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 890
Any time something is burned it leaves something behind. Burning is just a chemical reaction. The wax and oil are heated above the smoke point where they start to oxidize (or burn). The bulk of the fat or oil burns off, leaving behind carbon polymers.

We are both right. Just different terminology, and I made the mistake of shortening up the process for simplicity's sake, assuming most people who like cast iron would already be familiar with the seasoning process.

Anyway, fats, oils, and waxes are all made from lipids- the composition is just different :)


Sent from my iPhone using Discuss Cooking
__________________
Skittle68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2017, 06:54 PM   #19
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 19,658
Thanks for the additional information. Looking forward to hearing how it goes.
__________________

__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.