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Old 12-29-2008, 12:48 PM   #31
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Good ideas coookies! Will do!
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Old 12-29-2008, 12:55 PM   #32
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Oh and Leolady, forgot to mention, depending on your area you could check out a home salvage shop... can't remember exactly what they are called? Sort of like a reclaimed home goods store. There is one in western MA called Restore, they take old/vintage housewares (tubs, cabinets, chandeliers, you name it) and fix them up so that they are in good condition but still "vintage." you could check Restore out to get an idea of what you might find at one of those places and check out your area for one :)
Here they call them architectural antiques or architectural salvage. If you go to the ones in the scruffier parts of town, you can find some amazing deals. I have an old house so there are a few of these places I hit to find things like weights for old double hung windows, parts for radiators, etc. You might find some great old cabinet bases, LeoLady, for your marble counter tops.
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Old 12-29-2008, 01:08 PM   #33
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I am going to re-use all of the old cabinets [they were top of the line in their day], so I won't need any more.

But I am going to replace the hollow core doors with paneled ones, so I will be looking for them. And I need flooring for the kitchen, breakfast area, living room, and hallway. I am thinking about using wood.
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Old 12-29-2008, 01:16 PM   #34
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You can definitely find the old, panelled doors at an architectural salvage place. I've gotten several over the years. Plus the old door hardware, too. Again, if you go to the places in the rougher parts of town, the things haven't been cleaned up or re-finished yet so the prices are much better.

As coookies mentioned, Habitat For Humanity runs a place like this is most larger cities called ReStore. Ours has a huge assortment of doors that includes modern, hollow core, old solid wood, and commercial. If you have one near you, it's worth the trip. Be sure and take your measurements with you.
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Old 12-29-2008, 01:45 PM   #35
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I have not given up yet!

I will find a better alternative! Thanks for all the advice folks!
Sometimes you can find old bowling alley. I would love to use it as a counter with the dots and all scattered about.

I would use the slate as long as you had substantial support underneath. Think of it as a large tile. You can have a 1/4" thick tile counter then why not a 1/4" slate one?

I definately would clean and seal it though. Good luck, post pics if you use it.
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Old 12-29-2008, 01:49 PM   #36
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What a fabulous idea! Heck, I think one of those long lab tables would make a spectacular dining table!
yeah if I ever see one pop on craigslist I am totally snatching it!

Right now it is annoying because I see things that would work for me but I have nowhere to store them and I am months from demolishing the kitchen. I am hoping for it to be a spring/summer project. I have alot to get done before that. I am only doing a sort of rough temp kitchen at this time because my budget is non existent but I am hoping it can be sort of cool with found/reclaimed stuff. I am planning on alot of open shelving a) because I never can find anything and b) I have alot of awesome looking cookware (much of it vintage) so why not show it off.

my big debate is how exactly to use my "dining room" my kitchen is small and opens directly to this room and I would like it to function as sort of an extention of the kitchen as I dont have any use for a formal dining room, I am not sure how to furhish it.. It must incorporate this sort of hideous old victorian china cabinet that was my great grandparents beyond that I am not sure but it will need to take on some of my kitchen storage needs. I prettty much need everything to be multi function as my house is tiny. Cooking and eating is a big part of my life though and how I entertain.

Leolady.... I know they say you can do wood floors in the kitchen but personally I think it makes life too hard. I installed new solid maple through my whole house and it is taking a beating (I am hard on stuff) the kitchen is definitely going to get something more durable.
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Old 12-29-2008, 01:58 PM   #37
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We had an oak kitchen floor in my house when I was a kid.

Wood would be was easy on my bad back. I can't think of anything else that would be durable, easy on my legs and back, and that would go with the rest of the house since the kitchen is open to it.
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Old 12-29-2008, 02:31 PM   #38
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Oak will look great and it will take a patina of use well.. One thing I learned... make sure that any gaps are sealed up really well. The finishes are washable but if water seeps between the boards you will get nasty discoloration there. Anywhere my install was not quite perfect I have had some problems that were probably avoidable if the floor finisher dude had taken some extra steps.
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Old 12-29-2008, 02:35 PM   #39
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I will take care! Thanks for the warning.

Whoo, you had me worried for a minute.
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Old 01-01-2009, 09:21 PM   #40
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OK!

I know it is dangerous, but I had another idea! What about me using maple 1 1/2 inch thick butcher block countertops?

They are relatively inexpensive, and can be installed easily. I would not have to worry much about the sink and water because the sink has these drainboards.



And on either side of the range I could insert this tile pattern flush, so I could put hot pots on it.



I could use the same pattern over the range as part of the existing solid yellow ceramic tile backsplash as well as on the old range space backsplash. I would surround the new tiles with more plain yellow tiles.

Would it be too much?
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