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Old 08-22-2013, 04:27 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by purple.alien.giraffe View Post
I don't really have measurements but I can give you the ingredients list for three that I like...
I don't use wet rubs when I BBQ, or smoke. I'm not sure why, because I use a wet rub when I do beer can chicken on the grill. I wet down my spices with Worcestershire sauce to make a paste. I just might try honey next time though. Thanks for the idea.
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Old 08-22-2013, 04:51 PM   #22
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I have never really noticed a difference between the black and yellow mustard seeds. If you grind the black ones, you get yellow powder.
Thanks! I used up all the yellow mustard seeds in b&b pickles, wasn't sure about using the brown, and went to Bulk Barn to get more yellow.
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Old 08-22-2013, 05:32 PM   #23
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Sometimes, depending on what my taste buds tell me, I will rub in some Worcestershire sauce over a brisket, then apply the dry rub, then rub it down with some good old yellow mustard. So, i guess it's a wet rub. Or I'll add a Tbsp of Bourbon to my dry rub to create a past and rub the meat down with that.. Yummmm.
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Old 03-09-2015, 11:36 PM   #24
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Resurrecting an old thread. I did a pork shoulder roast today on the gas grill, low and slow for 5 hours. I used this rub, called Billbos' Rub, from the SmokingMeatsForum:

Quote:
1/2 cup paprika
1/2 cup kosher salt
1/2 cup light brown sugar
1/2 cup granulated garlic
6 tablespoons granulated onion
1/4 cup chili powder
1 tablespoon fresh ground black pepper
1 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper

Just mix all together and store in glass or plastic. Rub generously!
I used Ghost Pepper Salt instead of cayenne (not much heat to it either way), and a mix of onion powder and dried minced onion instead of granulated (because I didn't have any). I also spread yellow mustard over the meat first so the rub would stick better (you don't taste the mustard after cooking), then wrapped it in plastic for a couple of hours before starting the grill. I used a mix of hickory and applewood chips for the smoke. It came or perfect, and the rub really worked. My wife doesn't care for dry rubs, but she raved over this.
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Old 03-10-2015, 11:07 AM   #25
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Looking over this old thread, I see I was remiss in thanking all who contributed.

A belated thank you all for helping out.

I was given a proprietary rub recipe I've used several times.
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Old 03-10-2015, 02:09 PM   #26
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Does proprietary means Private? Like you cannot share?

in the mean time here is my "go to" dry rob.

1 part paprika
1 part garlic salt (one with parsley flakes in it from Sam's club or you can add your own)
1/8 part cayenne pepper
1/8 part sugar in the row, comes in a brown box, it doesn't clump up.
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Old 03-10-2015, 02:12 PM   #27
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Does proprietary means Private? Like you cannot share?...
That's right Charlie. The person who gave it to me asked me not to share it.
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Old 03-10-2015, 07:21 PM   #28
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I use a blended seasoning that I get from Penzey's - BBQ 3000. Here's the link - and it lists all of the ingredients on the website.

https://www.penzeys.com/online-catal...-24/p-327/pd-s

I use it in my pulled pork, beef, and even in my chili. It is awesome and makes my job so much easier.

I used to make my own dry rubs, but found the BBQ 3000 to be at least as good as homemade in my (and hubby's) book.
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Old 03-10-2015, 10:25 PM   #29
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I found this segment very interesting on how to capture flavors:


The Marilyn Denis Show | HomemadeBasics
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Old 03-11-2015, 12:19 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
I found this segment very interesting on how to capture flavors:


The Marilyn Denis Show | HomemadeBasics
The stuff about the spices was very interesting. I wonder what other spices go in those groups. I wonder if one could classify herbs in a similar manner. Might be a project we could work on here.

As to her granola, I think it's overly simple. She might have mentioned that other rolled grains work well for the flakes and that a mix of nuts and seeds can enhance the flavour. I learned the hard way that you shouldn't add dried fruit before you bake it. Burnt dates or raisins are not nice. Granola is good even if you don't add any fruit.
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