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Old 02-13-2013, 09:14 AM   #1
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Cooking Stones

I'm interested in cooking stones for a wide range of cooking,from steaks to bread.
Has anyone got any advice on what kind of stone to use,cleanning,where to find them,prices ect.
Can i use in the house oven?

Many thanks!!!

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Old 02-13-2013, 11:47 AM   #2
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The idea of a baking stone is to provide even heat to the bottom of the food, mostly breads. It also somewhat compensates for oven temperature drop when opening the door and may absorb moisture. You can pay a little or a lot. You will be buying a ceramic. When they say "natural" baking stone, they don't mean cut stone. They mean natural ingredients of the ceramic. Size the stone so that it doesn't prevent natural heat flow in the oven. It can't, for instance, extend to the sides of the oven. You can use natural stone tiles from the hardware store. They may not last as long, but they're so cheap you don't worry about them, and you can cheaply keep different sizes to use in combination. For most baking, let the stone soak in the hot oven for a time to get it evenly hot.

Good brand ceramic stones about 14 inches square are about $40 from Amazon. Ceramic tiles, 12x12, $2 Home Depot.

I haven't used it, but FibraMent is an engineered stone that's also used to line large "stone" ovens.
Pizza
Discussion of stones in general at top of page. FibraMent about halfway down.
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Old 02-13-2013, 12:05 PM   #3
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We have an Old Pizza Oven (brand) stone. I wouldn't put a steak on it.
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Old 02-13-2013, 01:41 PM   #4
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Some restaurants serve meats on a thick slab of granite heated to a high temp and they are delivered to the customer sizzling. The meat cooks on the slab from the residual heat in the stone.
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Old 02-13-2013, 09:37 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Some restaurants serve meats on a thick slab of granite heated to a high temp and they are delivered to the customer sizzling. The meat cooks on the slab from the residual heat in the stone.
Interesting... is it effective or is it a gimmick?
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Old 02-13-2013, 09:40 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankZ View Post

Interesting... is it effective or is it a gimmick?
Both, in my experience I've had beef carpaccio served that way (not steak) and it was delicious. Impressive presentation, too.
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Old 02-13-2013, 10:21 PM   #7
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Interesting... is it effective or is it a gimmick?

I had it once in a restaurant in Aruba. The meat sizzling on the hot stone is brought to the table (in our case on a little platform) so the sizzling grease splattered onto your face and hands when you tried to cut off a slice of steak. Not to mention if you are a slow eater, the meat is well done like it or not.
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Old 02-13-2013, 10:24 PM   #8
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I like the stones that Pampered Chef has. They have several sizes. I don't remember the prices because I've had mine for quite a while.
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Old 02-13-2013, 11:16 PM   #9
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Both, in my experience I've had beef carpaccio served that way (not steak) and it was delicious. Impressive presentation, too.
How can you serve raw food on a screaming hot stone?
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Old 02-13-2013, 11:26 PM   #10
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Call around to stone countertop companies. They have all sorts of sink cutouts that they normally end up throwing out. They are typically 3/4-inch thick, and quite durable.

I got the slab of granite that I keep in my oven for $25, if I remember correctly, about ten years ago. I had them trim it to 2-inches smaller than the inside dimensions of my oven.

I bake breads and pizza directly on it. I keep forgetting to buy another so I can have a very close approximation of a pizza oven.
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