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Old 10-16-2006, 11:05 AM   #21
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By ideal would be a range (solid fuel is what I am used to, never had a gas one but oil was a nightmare) with an electric cooker for standby, an in summer and for the hob. But I would be happy with either gas or electric really. I'm not fussy!

I searched out this thread because I have just found myself with what might be Vera' old cooker.....it has to be lit with a match. My London hob has occasionally needed help with a clicker, but never the oven, and never a match. I am a bit wary of doing this, dispite everyone in Italy assuring me this is quite normal.....but I guess the best thing is to use the longest piece of spaghetti I can find. My sister was a severe burns victim and although we have always had ranges aand open fires I have a healthy respect for fire. I feel a LITTLE reassured that others have done this and lived to tell the tale!
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Old 10-16-2006, 11:25 AM   #22
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I have used both, but my homes have always had electric, (not by my choice). I've even spent time in the UK and had the experience of Aga radiant heat cooking. I prefer gas for top of stove cooking and convection for oven cooking. I am getting a dual fuel soon...about 9 weeks to go!
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Old 10-16-2006, 12:19 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VeraBlue
I grew up with an electric stove and oven, convinced that a gas stove would blow me to kingdom come (my Mother's words, not mine). Then, when I got married and got an apartment I was finally introduced to gas. I had to light the oven with a match each time, again convinced I'd blow myself to kingdom come, but I never did....

Now, I don't think I can ever cook on anything except gas. It would be a dealbreaker if my next home purchase didn't have gas..

What are you using and how do you feel about it.
I prefer a gas stove. My first apt in NYC, I cooked on an electric hotplate. It was amazing the dishes I could concoct on that gizmo, but electric I will never do, if I can avoid it. I've had some old stoves (in a duplex I rented) that were gas, and had to use a match to light the pilot and burners. The stove had character, but cleaning up all the matches was a pain.

Wanted to sell my home for the longest time, and noticed the homes for sale that are less expensive, have electric stoves. One realtor said, I'll check to see if it can be converted to gas. Just, not worth my while or $. I want gas!
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Old 10-16-2006, 12:49 PM   #24
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I too have cooked with both. I grew up with electric but have used gas almost exclusively as an adult. I love the instantaneous heat response of gas, but as B.T. stated, cooking pan types and materials and their response to heat must still be taken into consideration due to time lag of temperature change.

My ultimate would be a gas range with a smooth induction cooktop. You get the instantaneous temperature control with a smooth, heatless, flameless easy-clean cooktop that works with SS, and cast-iron, the only cooking vessels in my home. I'd have to say that from an engineering standpoint, temerature would be very easy to control, from a gentle simmer, to a rolling boil, or searing hot skillet. Plus, unless the pan was on the stove, even if left on full power, nothing gets hot.

Oh the beauty of electro-magnetic induction. But alas, my pocket book isn't likely to grow enough to allow me the luxury of change, and my gas range works fine, though I'm soon going to have to replace the main burner as the spark igniter is giving me problems. A match works for now though.

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Old 10-16-2006, 01:05 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VeraBlue
Like a tank used on an outdoor grill? I have lived in the suburbs of NYC my entire life. Without sounding offensive or worse, nitwitish, how much propane does it take to run a kitchen?
LP (Liquid Propane) 90 pound tanks are similar to outdoor grill tanks, only bigger. I go through about two 90 pound tanks a year. Depends on how much canning I do. We keep two tanks at all times, so when one runs out, it is easy to get the other in gear quickly. Then I get the empty one replaced pronto. I have cooked on electric, wood, and gas. Must say, my favorite is wood, but had to give it up with the present house . So gas is my next favorite fuel to use. I never did give electric a fair chance though, didn't like it from the start.
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Old 10-16-2006, 01:17 PM   #26
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Re propane - no answers here. Back to gas vs electric, the only thing I am concerned about is a monstrosity of a furnace in a closet -- that controls central air and heat. I imagine it controls my gas stove. It's probably a throw back from the 70's; but it's a pain to change the filter. I'm sure? it came up to code? So no fear about lighting an oven pilot light or blowing up -- except with this furnace from outer space. If I ever buy another home again, & I hope it's soon, Never will I buy a home with a furnace in a closet.
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Old 10-16-2006, 01:35 PM   #27
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I've cooked using both electricity and gas and have cooked using old, new and anything in between. I much prefer a gas cooktop and an electric oven.

When we moved into this old (1880) house it hadn't been lived in for some years and the people we bought it from only bought the house to "flip" it, so they never lived in it. Consequently they never used the kitchen. The stove they put in the kitchen could be categorized as something between a campfire and an Easy Bake oven. It was all electric, with three small burners and one large one, no timer for anything, no light in the oven. The most basic of the basic.

A couple of years later, a friend remodeled their kitchen and gave us their old stove. It was a glorious step up. Two large burners, two small burners, lift-top for cleaning under burners, timer, oven light, continuous clean oven. Thought I'd died and gone to heaven. However, I still missed cooking on gas.

A couple of years ago I had the chance to buy NEW. Hooray! We already heated with gas, so there was already a line in. We bought a gas cooktop and an electric self-cleaning oven. LOVE them both. The grids on the gas burners are huge and easy to remove for cleaning and the flame area is sealed, so cleaning any spills is as easy as pie. Plus, one of the large burners is a souped-up one with a gazillion BTUs.

I love the way I have infinite temperature control with the burners and the oven is a dream. If anyone's interested, the cooktop and oven are Whirlpool.
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Old 10-16-2006, 03:46 PM   #28
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We had gas growing up, but changed to electric when I in my teens somewhere. My mother adjusted. The thinking then was that electric was cleaner, more efficient, and less dangerous. Since I've been on my own I had first natural gas on a cheapo apartment unit, a larger and better electric range, and now my grandparents antique Magic Chef that runs on propane. I can work with any of them, but I like my current set up the best. I find that I can adjust the temp more quickly on the stove, and the oven heats up quickly and evenly. Admittedly, my grandfather modified this to get more BTUs out of propane.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VeraBlue
Like a tank used on an outdoor grill? I have lived in the suburbs of NYC my entire life. Without sounding offensive or worse, nitwitish, how much propane does it take to run a kitchen?
VB: It's basically the same fuel, but larger tanks that a truck comes and fills. Costs me about $120/yr. to cook nearly every day, often for one, but often for more.
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Old 10-16-2006, 05:47 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bullseye
...VB: It's basically the same fuel, but larger tanks that a truck comes and fills. Costs me about $120/yr. to cook nearly every day, often for one, but often for more.
With reference to natural gas and propane, propane burns much hotter than does natural gas. 1 cubic foot of propane delivers about 2,500 Btu (British Thermal Units), while Natural gas, which is mostly methane, delivers about 1012 Btu per cubic foot.

So, propane is better than twice as hot as is natural gas.

Just so's ya knows.

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Old 10-16-2006, 06:13 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lulu
By ideal would be a range (solid fuel is what I am used to, never had a gas one but oil was a nightmare) with an electric cooker for standby, an in summer and for the hob. But I would be happy with either gas or electric really. I'm not fussy!

I searched out this thread because I have just found myself with what might be Vera' old cooker.....it has to be lit with a match. My London hob has occasionally needed help with a clicker, but never the oven, and never a match. I am a bit wary of doing this, dispite everyone in Italy assuring me this is quite normal.....but I guess the best thing is to use the longest piece of spaghetti I can find. My sister was a severe burns victim and although we have always had ranges aand open fires I have a healthy respect for fire. I feel a LITTLE reassured that others have done this and lived to tell the tale!
Hi Lulu
Don't use spaghetti, get wooden skewers. Look for the kind you'd use to make kabobs. They don't burn as quickly as wooden matches, and are usually at least 6 inches long. Just remember to work quickly. Depending on how difficult the knobs are to work will determine if you turn on the gas before lighting the skewer. Ideally, you want your 'match' lit before you turn on the gas. But, the machine needs to be primed a bit, so I always turn on the gas first, then light the match. If it doesn't catch immediately, turn it off and wait a moment before trying again. Don't worry or you'll tremble. Good luck.
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