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Old 08-02-2015, 06:50 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
That was supposed to be joke....
I think she got it. It's fun to get an answer, though, isn't it? Some people have a dry sense of humor
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Old 08-02-2015, 07:11 PM   #22
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How many watts is an 18,000 BTU burner on a gas range? j/k
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That was supposed to be joke....
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I think she got it. It's fun to get an answer, though, isn't it? Some people have a dry sense of humor
Yup, the "j/k" was a big hint. It was just a bit of fun answering it.
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Old 08-03-2015, 11:57 AM   #23
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Yes, but if you have a 240 volt service, with a 15 amp fuse, you would have 3600 watts available. If you are a small appliance manufacturer for a 240 volt market, you could make a deep fryer rated at more than 1800 watts.
Thats right. I guess they limit the wattage to accommodate the US market that uses 120 volts at 15 and 20 amp protected as a general rule.
In the US, all kitchen counter receptacles MUST be on a 20 amp small appliance circuit and there must be at least two circuits.

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My original point was that a pot of oil on a stove top has more energy available to heat the oil.
Thats right again as long as the wattage of the stove element is higher than that of the fryer.
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Old 08-04-2015, 02:23 AM   #24
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I too have a deep stainless steel cooking pot that I could use as a deep fat fryer. It's kind of tall tho, and my concern would be having to reach in deep with the tongs to turn the chicken over or whatever.

I am still learning to fry chicken with my 10" cast iron skillet. I put in enough oil to go halfway up the chicken pieces I am frying.

Once again, I let the oil temp get too high upon start and the chicken bubbled and boiled furiously and got burnt on the outside. I have to remember not to get the oil too hot. Even 350F was a bit too hot. I'm trying not to have to use a thermometer, but rather set the stove top dial at a temp that gently starts to oil boil the chicken, but not violently bubble and boil and splatter and burn the outside coating. I did it one time last month and was pleased with the results. The outside wasn't all burnt, yet the inside cooked up well. I think people tend to overheat their oil when cast iron frying chicken. I did. I'm still learning.
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Old 08-04-2015, 01:29 PM   #25
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I too have a deep stainless steel cooking pot that I could use as a deep fat fryer. It's kind of tall tho, and my concern would be having to reach in deep with the tongs to turn the chicken over or whatever.

I am still learning to fry chicken with my 10" cast iron skillet. I put in enough oil to go halfway up the chicken pieces I am frying.

Once again, I let the oil temp get too high upon start and the chicken bubbled and boiled furiously and got burnt on the outside. I have to remember not to get the oil too hot. Even 350F was a bit too hot. I'm trying not to have to use a thermometer, but rather set the stove top dial at a temp that gently starts to oil boil the chicken, but not violently bubble and boil and splatter and burn the outside coating. I did it one time last month and was pleased with the results. The outside wasn't all burnt, yet the inside cooked up well. I think people tend to overheat their oil when cast iron frying chicken. I did. I'm still learning.
My wife and I both use a cast iron fry pan to fry chicken.
We never fill it up half way. If you add that much oil, when you drop the chicken, it will be almost covered with oil. This is not the idea. IMO.
The ideal oil height should about 1" or less. So, that when you drop the chicken, a little more than half is submerged.
Heres how we do it.

Add oil to about 1" to the pan and put the stove top dial on medium.
This when I start to cut up the whole fryer and season each piece very, very well with S&P.
This takes me about 10 minutes.
I put plain regular flour in a very large SS mixing bowl and dredge the chicken very well in the flour.
I then add one of the pieces that no one cares about like the neck, gizzard or liver. This test tells me if its hot enough. I then add several pieces making certain not to over crowd the pan. It should freely fry.
Cover pan for 10 minutes. Remove cover and continue to cook on that side until nice and brown.
Turn and cook on the other side until nice and colored and skin very crispy.
Reserve to wire rack to drain.

This method has worked for many, many years and will work for you too!

ps....burning the bottom sometimes occurs due to the coating process. I have tried all kinds of mixes and washes and found plain old flour works the very best. Good Luck even though you will not need any luck.
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Old 08-04-2015, 04:49 PM   #26
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Thanks, but you mention nothing about oil temp. I don't have a cover.

I'm saying...next time I heat up the oil, I won't set the dial to high.
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Old 08-04-2015, 04:56 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Caslon View Post
Thanks, but you mention nothing about oil temp. I don't have a cover.

I'm saying...next time I heat up the oil, I won't set the dial to high.
He said to set the dial at medium and heat for about 10 minutes. Then test the temperature by putting a little flour in the oil. If it bubbles, it's ready. It's not necessary to know the temperature, especially since you said you didn't want to use a thermometer.

It's not necessary to cover it. It will just take a little longer to cook.

Btw, heating that much oil on high could cause a fire.
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Old 08-04-2015, 05:40 PM   #28
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I use a 4-qt or 6-qt sauce pan instead of a skillet. The taller pan gives you a safety margin.
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Old 08-04-2015, 06:44 PM   #29
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But you have to reach down inside with your tongs.

I just finished frying up a thigh in my 8" lodge. I kept the oil temp low and the thigh fried up nice.
No roiling splattering boil. Once a cast iron skillet heats up the oil, you can keep the chicken frying nicely at dial 2-4. I'll never again try and fry up chicken in my skillets with too hot an oil temp.
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Old 08-04-2015, 06:52 PM   #30
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But you have to reach down inside with your tongs.

I just finished frying up a thigh in my 8" lodge. I kept the oil temp low and the thigh fried up nice.
No roiling splattering boil. Once a cast iron skillet heats up the oil, you can keep the chicken frying nicely at dial 2-4. I'll never again try and fry up chicken with too hot an oil temp.

Good to hear, Caslon! Glad you were successful!
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