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Old 09-21-2008, 01:48 PM   #21
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butane (pure) has no smell, but some have a smell (usually a Mercaptan base) added.
the best thing to do is to try fill it and then let it stand upright for a few minutes, you`re supposed to do this anyway to prevent flaring of the flame.
then have a listen for any obvious leakage, you could try putting it in a plastic bag and sealing it airtight and waiting for a while, if it`s leaking the bag will get bigger.

you could also test with a match around the base too, but only if tests 1 and 2 pass.

So long and Thanks for all the Fish ;)

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Old 09-21-2008, 02:13 PM   #22
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thanks dude

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Old 09-21-2008, 02:47 PM   #23
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I'm a soap bubble guy. Put a few drops of dish soap in a small glass of water and use your finger to "paint" some on around the screw you loosened. If there's a leak you will see tiny bubbles forming. I actually keep a spray bottle of soap & water in the basement with my plumbinig stuff. I used it to find a slow leak in my ATV tire last week and stick a plug in it. I use it if I am running new gas lines, too, to check my connections.
And of course all the ways YT mentioned will work, too, but soap & water will find a leak no matter how small and is very safe.

Knowing YT, he would probably want a baggie full of butane to dispose of
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Old 09-21-2008, 02:52 PM   #24
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excellent suggestion.

thanks dude
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Old 09-21-2008, 02:54 PM   #25
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Along the same lines, you could just stick the bottom into a bit of water and look for bubbles. Do not submerge it all the way, but just enough to get the screw in.
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Old 09-22-2008, 06:21 AM   #26
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thanks for the suggestion

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