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Old 07-09-2013, 06:57 PM   #1
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Cast iron skillet--seasoning!

I've just bought three cast iron skillets as i am going to do some barbecuing.

I'm a little confused on the seasoning instructions that are given and would be grateful if someone could correct me.

a] there is a black coating almost like teflon across all pans. I understood this to be just a factory coating to protect against rusting - not that there is a problem with rust but obviously potential buyers are put off. It says that its pre-seasoned and so I thought this would come off with the heating in the oven. I did read somewhere that when one puts the pan in the oven first time one gets smoke and burning smells as the coating is burnt off. The instructions said that one coats the entire pan in vegetable oil and then puts it in the oven at 150 deg C for an hour.

b] You are then told to remove excess oil which i did and some of the black came off as well. I investigated further and found that it just scrapped off with a knife.

c] I assume that the black is a factory coating and should come off to leave plain grey cast iron. Once the black is off then i presume that i heat the pan in the oven as per a]. Then the instructions on seasoning make sense, repeating the exercise every so often and the pan surface remains clean and non stick.

I'd be grateful if someone could put me right before i do anything with the other two.

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Old 07-09-2013, 07:08 PM   #2
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Up the temp from 302F to 450F for one hour. I'm not sure what they're talking about when they say to wipe out the excess oil (b).
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Old 07-09-2013, 07:31 PM   #3
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Quote:
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Up the temp from 302F to 450F for one hour. I'm not sure what they're talking about when they say to wipe out the excess oil (b).
Thanks for the reply. I'm not sure they know what they're talking about... hence my post

But is this black coating meant to remain?
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Old 07-09-2013, 07:56 PM   #4
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You wipe the excess oil before you bake it. It just means to put a thin coat of oil all around the pan, inside and out. Bake the pan upside down so no oil "cakes" on the bottom of the pan. Let it cool in the oven.
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Old 07-09-2013, 08:27 PM   #5
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The pans are pre-seasoned per your post so you don't have to do anything except start cooking in them.
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Old 07-10-2013, 02:27 AM   #6
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The pans are pre-seasoned per your post so you don't have to do anything except start cooking in them.
ORLY? Technically yes. Many find that the thin factory seasoned coating wears off fast if you don't coddle your pan by slow seasoning cooking bacon 20+ times to get some good thick carbon build up.

Some like me have learned that a newly bought seasoned fry pan could use a few more seasonings.

It's not a big deal. I'll be cooking some frozen fries on a cookie sheet at 425F and afterwards up the temp to 450F and coat my cast iron pan and bake another layer of carbon on it, so that my scrubbing it (just a simple dish scrubber) won't remove the thin factory carbon coating. Impossible for the new thin factory carbon layer to be removed by just hot water scrubbing? Nope.
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Old 07-10-2013, 08:54 AM   #7
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ORLY? Technically yes. Many find that the thin factory seasoned coating wears off fast if you don't coddle your pan by slow seasoning cooking bacon 20+ times to get some good thick carbon build up...
Cooking foods with a little oil in the pan adds to the seasoning during the process of cooking. There is no special need to season a pan other than by cooking in it.

At least, that's how I've done it.
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Old 07-10-2013, 04:04 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Cooking foods with a little oil in the pan adds to the seasoning during the process of cooking. There is no special need to season a pan other than by cooking in it.

At least, that's how I've done it.
I thought cast iron was slightly surface porous which is why instructions say season to avoid sticking. The oil then gets into the surface providing the non stick. Hence why they say don't put in dish washers as they thoroughly clean compared with a quick wipe in a washing up bowl.

After warming mine i have to say that i'm going to remove the remaining coating as it seems pretty poor. Can't help feeling that the expensive pans are rather different and will have a look when i'm next in town. I just bought a pair on impulse really and are probably cheapish types.
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Old 07-10-2013, 04:24 PM   #9
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Not sure which brand you have. If it's pre-seasoned, you shouldn't have to remove it to add another layer of seasoning. The seasoning primarily prevents rusting and provides a slicker surface.
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Old 07-11-2013, 08:19 AM   #10
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I am with Andy on this one--no need to make life more difficult. The pan is pre seasoned, so just start cooking with it. (Wash it first, if you haven't already, just to get the factory/store dust and dirt off. Use soap and hot water and a dishcloth.)

Frying bacon or chicken is a good way to get started. Each time you use the pan, wash it, let it dry on a low burner, and wipe it down with a little oil while it is still hot.

In my kitchen, cast iron is used every day, and every time I use it I do the heating and wipe down. My pans are not as non-stick as teflon, but they are close.

I just noticed the mention of barbecuing--the grill can definitely get hot enough to burn any seasoning off. Can you tell us just how you want to use these pans for barbecuing?
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