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Old 12-31-2006, 04:28 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Veloce
"Because the copper disc wasn't fully encapsulaed it's been reported that the copper will melt at high heat ruining the pan and also possibly your cook top."

The melting point of copper is 1083.0 C (1356.15 K, 1981.4 F). It's not going to melt on a residential (or commercial) range.
Some high output gas cooktops put out 17,000 BTU or more.

Don't know if that would melt pure copper but might melt an alloy and/or cause the steel disc to release from the copper core.
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Old 01-01-2007, 12:27 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Some time ago, I posted that info from a Consumer Reports magazine. The disk separated from the pan body and remained on the burner. It's not at all clear that it was because the copper melted as there is also aluminum in that disk and some attachment method for connecting the disk to the pan.
That sounds like a manufacturing defect.

Stainless Steel cookware is not meant to be used at high heat. The directions that accompany every pan or set I have ever seen says that in large, bold letters. Unfortunately, too few people read those pamphlets, and then they blame the company for bad pans.....
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Old 01-01-2007, 12:50 PM   #13
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No need to scold. The 10" skillet, for example, has a disk about 3 inches in diameter due to the curved sides. Ther is no way to sear a piece of meat or fish in the skillet while keeping the flame to less than three inches in daimeter.
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Old 01-04-2007, 01:55 AM   #14
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I love urban myths and misinformation ....

I have a set of Emerilware SS and I have had a meltdown that was my own fault. I washed my 6-qt pot, put it on a stove burner and turned a burner on under another pot to boil some water ... oops ... I turned it on under the empty pot! My daughter called, we talked for a while ... I didn't spot my mistake until too late.

Sorry, but the disk on the bottom of my 10-inch Emerilware skillet is NOT 3-inches in diameter ... it's 7.75+ inches, the same as the diameter of the base on the inside of the skillet. Take the ATK (America's Test Kitchen) tests results (published in Cook's Illustrated) and read what they spec out about each pan they tested ... the difference between the diameter of the top and bottom of a fry pan varies between brands. Going to the ATK study of 12-inch fry pans ... their darling "benchmark" All-Clad had a base surface of 9.25 inches ... Emerilware came in at 9-inches ... not a significant difference.

When it comes to a meltdown ... no, the copper is not what melts. What melts is the aluminum core .. the aluminum melts, the SS warps, this breaks the seal from the impact bonding ... the aluminum leaks out onto the stove. And, it wasn't "fused" to the stove top ... when it was cool enough to handle the puddles of aluminum lifted off quite easily.
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Old 01-04-2007, 02:04 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
No need to scold. The 10" skillet, for example, has a disk about 3 inches in diameter due to the curved sides. Ther is no way to sear a piece of meat or fish in the skillet while keeping the flame to less than three inches in daimeter.
I wasn't scolding, Andy, merely pointing out what I hear from customers when I'm on the sales floor fielding questions. Sorry if it sounded that way.

I haven't seen any 10 inch skillets with only a 3-inch disk, but I guess there may be some out there like that.
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Old 01-04-2007, 08:38 AM   #16
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Couldn't find the URL Andy M. posted but this one is interesting.

ABC12.com: Consumer News-Testing cookware
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Old 01-04-2007, 09:06 AM   #17
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Last night's question about Tools of the Trade reminded me of the warning that came with my TOTT Belgique cookware.

The instructions included these warnings.

"CAUTION:Electric stove tops are capable of higher
temperatures and generate higher heat. Please use
extra caution when cooking on a high temperature.

CAUTION: Tools of the Trade's constrution creates rapid
and efficient dispersal of heat throughout the utensil. Because
of the combination of metals used, the base could seperate or
liquefy through misuse, such as allowing pots to boil dry or
leaving it empty on an open flame or using a high setting on
certain electric stoves that can reach temperatures on excess
of 1,000F (538C)."
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Old 01-04-2007, 10:09 AM   #18
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Clarifications:

I posted no URL, just made an observation about a Consumer Reports article.

The CR article tested to see what would happen if a pot was mistakenly left on a burner empty or allowed to cook dry. This test was performed with all the products in the test. Not all failed.

The 10" skillet I had was not Emerilware, it was Cuisinart Everyday.

No misinformation or urban myths, just the facts.
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Old 01-04-2007, 11:46 AM   #19
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I've never seen one in person but I would think that Cuisinart 10" stir fry would have a bigger disc bottom than 3 in.

Didn't measure but the 10" Chef's Classic skillit I was checking out at TJMaxx Tuesday had what I would guess to be an 8" bottom.
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Old 01-04-2007, 12:15 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron W.
I've never seen one in person but I would think that Cuisinart 10" stir fry would have a bigger disc bottom than 3 in.

Didn't measure but the 10" Chef's Classic skillit I was checking out at TJMaxx Tuesday had what I would guess to be an 8" bottom.

Ron:

I no longer have the skillet so I am working from memory. The point was that the disk on the bottom was smaller because of the curved sides od the pan and smaller than the burner ring on the stove. This allowed the flame to reach the undisked portion of the pan, causing burning of the food in the pan.
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