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Old 11-06-2007, 04:57 PM   #11
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I think I "zoned" in on what Robo and Micheal had said on her reply!! Ahh big sigh of relief when I saw your post !!! Im not sure what ML it is but Im going to say 1ML it doesn't say anywhere on the tag or pots.....I feel like a proud Mama they are all hanging on my pot rack...so beautiful I cant WAIT to cook something !!! I don't know what??!! I have been wanting copper for sooo long !! I'm a self taught cook, well I have no professional training...just watching Mom & Grandma,that is the best as far as I'm concerned!. And I'm ALWAYS watching the FOODNET WORK. Is it OK to cook tomato based sauces in the copper pots? Sorry if that is a dumb question. Im assuming I can use them like my other pots only I will have better results? And there were no special instructions for first use so I will just wash & go !!!
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Old 11-06-2007, 05:03 PM   #12
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YEA it is 2ML !!!
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Old 11-06-2007, 05:41 PM   #13
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Sheila,

I cook with only 3 of my pans but have been very happy with them. I keep meaning to use more of them but haven't gotten around to REMOVING THE LACQUER COATING which you will have to do before you cook with yours. Buy some lacquer thinner (it's "mineral spirits" at any hardware store), get some soft cloth rags and go to town. It comes off pretty easily but does require some elbow grease, particularly around the handle and rivets. If you cook without removing the lacquer coating, you will have a mess on your hands. Mine all has/had a lacquer coating so I assume yours does too. The lacquer keeps the copper from oxidizing on the store shelves so it stays nice and shiny. Once you remove it the pans will slowly oxidize on your pot rack and will require periodic cleaning if you want them to stay shiny. I have found the easiest cleaning method is to cut a lemon in half, dip it in a saucer of table salt and polish away. The tin coating will scratch easily, so you MUST use wooden or plastic utensils. They do heat up incredibly fast. Did your set come with lids? If so, the lid handle will slide over the pan handle copper side down quite neatly, a very nice feature if you store them in a hanging position. Enjoy.
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Old 11-06-2007, 05:56 PM   #14
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Hmmm Im guessing mine does have the coating ?? but How do I tell? I couldnt wait so I boiled some water in one of the smaller sauce pans it did leave some marks on the bottom where the gas burner was I hope this isnt going to ruin the pot?! So it sounds like I have to wait to use them and find out if I have the coating before I use them....darn. I bought the pieces seperatly the stock pot and large frypan have lids but the others do not thanks for the tip on the lids I probably would of never figured that out ...duh
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Old 11-06-2007, 06:56 PM   #15
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Hi Sheila!

Sounds like you got a great deal on some really good cookware - and I sure wouldn't take them back! And, yes - the tin lining on good copper cookware is applied by hand.

Yes, you can cook acidic foods like tomato based sauces in them - the tin lining is non-reactive .... that's what it is for.

And, I will stand by my previous statements - threat this cookware with respect - tin is a soft metal - but treat it right and it will last a lifetime. Like Lynnie said, "The tin coating will scratch easily, so you MUST use wooden or plastic utensils. They do heat up incredibly fast." You can't put it on the stove and walk away like you can cast iron ...

As for removing the lacquer - the boiling water and baking soda method sometimes works - lacquer thinner definately does. See here for discussions on the subject.

Copper does change color when heated ... doesn't mean it's ruined or damagerd - just been heated. Over time - your copper will become darker.
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Old 11-06-2007, 07:24 PM   #16
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Thanks Michael !! Im so relieved....now I cant wait to use them I guess I know what Im doing tomorrow !! Lacquer removing!!
Looking forward for some great recipes from y'all to cook in my pots !!
and looking forward to getting to know all of our group!! Sorry I came in so "loudly" Im just glad I stumbled upon it (group)...I think I googled the cookware...anyways Im rambling.....Thanks for the advice and tips and rest assured I will take very good care of them...just like my cast iron I want to hand all this stuff down.....many many many years from now.
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Old 11-11-2007, 12:57 AM   #17
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I just bought a Beka Marco Pierre White heat collection 1.5 cm stainless steel lined copper steak pan. Is the stainless steel lined copper pan better than the tin lined? Also would I be able to fry foods like fried chicken in the stainless steel lined copper pan? Thanks for your help.
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Old 11-11-2007, 10:11 AM   #18
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Hi sat511. Welcome to DC.

Tin is a softer metal and will wear off requiring re-tinning of the pan. SS is harder and therefore more durable.

You would be able to do fried chicken in this pan but it shouldn't be your first choice. A heavier metal pan, such as cast iron, is better suited for frying.
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Old 11-12-2007, 01:14 PM   #19
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Copper Newbie Question

I just purchased the Baumalu Copper set from Tuesday Morning. It is unlaquered, 2M, and tin lined. I have been following this thread and now i am afraid to use them.

I was so afraid to use "high heat" it took me 20 minutes to boil water last night. When you guys say tin softens at 340 degrees what does that actually mean? Can I use my electric stove on high to bring water to boil?
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Old 11-12-2007, 03:01 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisa H.
I was so afraid to use "high heat" it took me 20 minutes to boil water last night. When you guys say tin softens at 340 degrees what does that actually mean? Can I use my electric stove on high to bring water to boil?
Tin is a soft metal - it can be scratched easily when cold and at it's hardest state by anything harder (like scouring pads or metal utensils). This is why you should only use wooden or silicone utensils for cooking in tin-lined copper.

Now, to demonstrate what is ment by tin is a soft mental and softens at 350F and melts at 450F - you need a stick of butter right out of the refrigerator, a small plate, and a fork. Unwrap the butter and put it on the plate - now drag the tines of the fork across the top of the butter. It leaves marks, doesn't it? Now, let the butter sit for 2-3 hours at room temp (assuming 70-80F) and try it again. Finally, put the plate in the oven on the lowest setting for an hour, and try it again. You have just demonstrated to yourself what happens to the tin lining at various temperatures.

Before you put your pot on high heat to boil water - you might want to read this, and this, and this .... and there are other sites that discuss cooking in copper that would all advise against it. Personally, I wouldn't go above medium ... or maybe a notch below that.

Hope this helps ....
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