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Old 10-02-2010, 09:21 AM   #11
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I like the grill idea. I love CI and have smoked/stunk up my house many times! I've also heard that you can put it in a bonfire and pull it out the next day, when cooled and clean the build up crud off with a wire brush. That just seems so cruel! I also use crisco, it makes the surface nice and ssmooth with a beautiful shine. I love my CI and want to be burried with all of it!
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Old 10-02-2010, 11:08 AM   #12
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Modern dish washing soaps (Dawn, Joy, etc,) are very mild, and mostly rinsing agents..Used sensibly they will not harm the surface of a well seasoned CI pan.

IMO the Myth is a hold over from days gone by when Great-Grandma used Lye soap...Lye soap is/was very caustic and would degrade the surface....

To the OP...If your pan is very bad, (rust, and heavy build up of "crud" on the exterior etc) Lye can be your friend...Go to the hardware store and buy a box of Household Lye...Fill a 5 gallon bucket with water..add the contents of the box of lye to the water. Repeat...Add Lye to the water...Not water to the Lye. Fill the bucket with water first.. Lye is very caustic and will burn your skin. Protect your skin and eyes....Attach a sturdy piece of string to the pan and lower it into the lye solution...Depending on the build up of crud, outside temperature etc. it can take from 3-4 days to 2 weeks..This process will totally, 100%, completely strip the pan from all carbon build up (seasoning).. the metal will be a dull gray....it's original color and is now ready for seasoning...I just finished two 10 in. skillets using this method, and they are well on their way to being beautiful well seasoned pans...

Most any type of oil will work to season with....A Sticky/tacky surface is caused by not completely turning/burning the fat into a carbon...Too low of a temperature, or not enough time exposed to the temperature,(or both) causes this condition...Not the type of oil...A very thin coat of oil/Crisco is best. Create layers of carbon by repeating the seasoning process two, three, or more times....HTH

Enjoy!
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Old 10-02-2010, 12:28 PM   #13
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I remove the old seasoning on newly purchased CI since I have no idea what it was used for last or whether the seasoning is rancid or not. I use heat, the BBQ or a torch, and burn off the old residue. A wire wheel will then remove the residue. I season like most, a light coating of oil in an oven.
Secondly, I've don't buy into the carbon build up theory. Carbon is oxidized material, and is not at all tasty Also, 350% will not oxidize oil, and if it did, that sticky residue would be black.
Surfaces become non stick by becoming slick. Teflon has little porosity, and therefore little sticking. CI, on the other hand, is very porous. What I think happens with seasoning is that as heat is applied, the pores close, and when cooling, oil is drawn into the metal, filling the pores. If the metal will not absorb all the oil, you get the sticky mess. Well seasoned CI can be scraped without damaging the surface, my preferred method of removing built up food residue, or carbon build up. I use an old broken off spatula blade, and a little water for lubricant.
This is also why I am not a fan of new CI. You cannot get a smooth surface with all those dimples.
All above my opinion.
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Old 10-04-2010, 02:09 AM   #14
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Hey thanks for all the replies. Very interesting. Seems there's hope for my pan yet.
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Old 10-04-2010, 08:56 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by Bigjim68 View Post
...
This is also why I am not a fan of new CI. You cannot get a smooth surface with all those dimples.
...
You can, it just takes power tools and a certain amount of elbow grease.
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Old 10-04-2010, 09:18 AM   #16
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Hey thanks for all the replies. Very interesting. Seems there's hope for my pan yet.
There is always hope for cast iron. There is almost nothing that you can do to it that you can not come back from.
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Old 10-04-2010, 07:26 PM   #17
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I've used coarse salt, a halved lemon and elbow grease to get the crud out then rinse it well, dry it in a hot oven, spread crisco over it and "bake" for 30 or so minutes then wipe it out and let it cool on the stove. I've heard the "No soap" rule too so did this instead. It's nice to know Dawn would be fine!
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Old 10-04-2010, 07:39 PM   #18
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I agree wholeheartedly with JMEDIGER ,not sure of the lemon thoough.,in fact americas test kitchen did the same thing,or very near to it. check them out for the TNT way.
I would tend towards boiling water in it /lid on til clean and then reseason it ,just the easy way around.
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Old 12-25-2010, 08:36 PM   #19
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Hey there, not sure if you were able to figure it out, but below is a great site, I have used this method and it worked great.

How to Remove Rust From Cast Iron | eHow.com
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Old 01-01-2011, 03:09 PM   #20
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Hey there, not sure if you were able to figure it out, but below is a great site, I have used this method and it worked great.

How to Remove Rust From Cast Iron | eHow.com
Thanks!
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