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Old 06-05-2009, 03:32 AM   #11
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Okay so I covered the whole pan in crisco shortening and baked for 450 for an hour, now the pan has like an orange or copper color to it. Looks similar to the color the burger residue had. Is this copper color normal?
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Old 06-05-2009, 08:38 AM   #12
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After sanding you should'a thoroughly brillo'd the interior, thoroughly rinsed with hot water & a stiff brush. Wipe dry while pot is still hot from the hot rinse water. Prior to oiling you should warm pot on stovetop to complete drying. After pot is thoroughly dried and still on stovetop spread or melt shortening or oil. When oil has been heated, use paper towels to:
assist in spreading seasoning
remove excess seasoning
assess cleanliness / readiness of pan to be seasoned
this wiping of hot shortening with paper towels is sort of like a final rinse
the above should be repeated with fresh towels until the paper towels cease to blacken
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Old 06-05-2009, 10:39 AM   #13
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What is the purpose behind seasoning, anyway? I will assume that it has nothing to do with the traditional meaning of "flavoring", so does it act as a non-stick surface? Prevent absorption of food into the iron? Make it easier to clean?
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Old 06-05-2009, 10:46 AM   #14
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What is the purpose behind seasoning, anyway? I will assume that it has nothing to do with the traditional meaning of "flavoring", so does it act as a non-stick surface? Prevent absorption of food into the iron? Make it easier to clean?
Somewhat like the blueing / browning done on firearms.
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Old 06-05-2009, 11:16 AM   #15
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so does it act as a non-stick surface? Prevent absorption of food into the iron? Make it easier to clean?
Yes, yes, and yes.
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Old 06-05-2009, 11:37 AM   #16
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Quote:
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What is the purpose behind seasoning, anyway? I will assume that it has nothing to do with the traditional meaning of "flavoring", so does it act as a non-stick surface? Prevent absorption of food into the iron? Make it easier to clean?

...and keeps it from rusting.
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Old 06-05-2009, 11:46 AM   #17
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Seasoning on Cast iron is pure and simple carbon...Carbonized fats and oils....The build up of carbon (seasoning) comes from years, and years of use. The more it’s used, the better “seasoned” it becomes. With proper care, over time it will become virtually non-stick cookware. The initial seasoning process, now done by some manufacturers, is to prevent the iron from rusting, and giving foods cooked in it a metallic taste. The consumer can add an additional layer(s) of carbonize fat (seasoning) to the surface, by following the manufacturer’s directions. Additionally, each time the pan is used for frying, making cornbread etc. you are adding to the seasoning process --- You are carbonizing oils and fats that are deposited as a thin layer on the cooking surface. It is the build up of these layers over years, that qualifies the pan to one day be referred to as ...”a well seasoned cast iron pan”


Enjoy!
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Old 06-05-2009, 11:47 AM   #18
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It also, eventually once it is built up enough, acts as a barrier against acidic foods eating away at the metal.
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Old 06-05-2009, 11:48 AM   #19
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Awesome answers, everyone...thanks!
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Old 06-05-2009, 11:50 AM   #20
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Awesome answers, everyone...thanks!
DC is an awesome place Erik....

Have Fun!!
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