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Old 08-20-2014, 07:09 AM   #1
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Multicooker vs Steamer

Good afternoon, just need a piece of advice from experienced ones. Recently I've seen in my neighbor's kitchen such a great multicooker . She's using it for making a main dish and for soups as well. Sometimes she even bakes some pies there. It has something like 20 functions or more, including steaming, backing, slow cooking and others.

Week ago I was thinking to buy a new steamer, but now trying to choose between it and multicooker (the last one is a bit more expensive, brand is Redmond).

Maybe somebody has any experience to use multicooker. Is it really useful? Should I buy it or simple steamer is enough. I have a family of 3, including a small child.

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Old 08-20-2014, 07:43 AM   #2
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It looks like this, not really big or small . Price is about 100 pounds together with cook book and steam basket.
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Old 08-20-2014, 08:24 AM   #3
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Good morning, welcome to DC!

I don't know much about kitchen appliances.

Below is the multicooker and steamer that I use in my kitchen.

I think I would select the appliance that gave me the most options for the money.

Good Luck!


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Old 08-20-2014, 09:11 AM   #4
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Multi-cooker than. I spend hours comparing the Redmond’s abilities and modes to cook different type of food. Although steamer is relatively cheaper, I d rather choose the multi-cooker. Maybe somebody use the same brand? Any opinion?
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Old 08-20-2014, 10:32 AM   #5
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I'm with Aunt Bea. Regular pots and pans are all multi-cookers. But if want that item, go for it.
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Old 08-20-2014, 11:17 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
Good morning, welcome to DC!

I don't know much about kitchen appliances.

Below is the multicooker and steamer that I use in my kitchen.

I think I would select the appliance that gave me the most options for the money.

Good Luck!



These two plus an oven, a cake pan and a braising pot.

That's my multicooker.
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Old 08-20-2014, 02:23 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alisa Jkey View Post
Good afternoon, just need a piece of advice from experienced ones. Recently I've seen in my neighbor's kitchen such a great multicooker . She's using it for making a main dish and for soups as well. Sometimes she even bakes some pies there. It has something like 20 functions or more, including steaming, backing, slow cooking and others.

Week ago I was thinking to buy a new steamer, but now trying to choose between it and multicooker (the last one is a bit more expensive, brand is Redmond).

Maybe somebody has any experience to use multicooker. Is it really useful? Should I buy it or simple steamer is enough. I have a family of 3, including a small child.
Hi, and welcome to Discuss Cooking

The cooking equipment you need depends more on what you like to cook than on the size of your family. Traditional cookware is much more versatile than a slow cooker or steamer, but if you often need to hold food at a certain temperature, or want a slow cooker for cooking food all day, then you might want to look at one of those.

A pan and steamer basket, as Aunt Bea pointed out, is sufficient for steaming, and I have a slow cooker I use for things like pulled pork, but I don't like the texture of most foods cooked all day in a slow cooker, so I don't use it a whole lot.

So it really depends on how you like to cook
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Old 08-20-2014, 02:37 PM   #8
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Yeah. They are all sort of multicookers. But to be really "multi," it has to be readily adaptable to multiple methods. I got a Presto Kitchen Kettle cooker, and the temperature control runs from warm, then 200, and up to 400F. The basket can fry or steam. While it can steam, slow cook, boil, of fry and do any of them well enough, if you fry frequently, it can get tied up as a fryer, unless you pour up the oil each time. I use mine as a fryer, and it's a perfect fryer for two to four people, because it has enough power to recover oil temperature quickly, and the basket is pretty clearly a fryer basket. So I to the other job in other pots and devices. I have never been tempted to buy a dedicated steamer appliance. I can easily steam in a pot on the range. Without automatic temperature control, the range is not so suited for frying.
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Old 08-30-2014, 04:32 AM   #9
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Well, Redmond has a bunch of modes and some types has unlimited modes because of Multichief option. But I'm thinking that 10-20 is enough to cook typical dishes, and steam, fry, bake and so on. Moreover, they give 24 months warranty, it's kinda more than other brands give. Thank you for your opinions! I'm going to buy it soon, and share how it is.
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Old 08-30-2014, 04:45 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
These two plus an oven, a cake pan and a braising pot.

That's my multicooker.
Well, maybe you understand it wrong. As for me, the main advantage of muliti-cooker is that you can put the ingredients inside, press the mode and set timer. Let’s say do it after lunch time. And voila – multicooker makes a dinner.
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