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Old 04-04-2005, 06:26 PM   #41
 
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No. It is acidic also.....in a cast iron skillet, it will discolor.
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Old 04-04-2005, 06:36 PM   #42
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Sarah,

lots of good advice on here that I would take if I were you. I've had my cast iron pans for almost 30 years , however I didnt realize how to clean them properly. I washed mine with hot water and soap, and sometimes scoured them, and then seasoned them with oil. Just wipe the pan clean, then wash it out with soap and water, because if you use your pan for more than one item, its best to really clean it out good, saves transferring germs. Back in the olden days lol, these pans were only used for one dish, so no worry about transfer of germs with beef, chicken, etc.
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Old 04-04-2005, 06:38 PM   #43
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thanks amber
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Old 04-05-2005, 09:58 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sarah
what is a roast without lemon juice?
I've never done this. Lemon juice - OK for chicken or fish, but what does lemon juice bring to the taste of a hunk of beef?
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Old 04-05-2005, 11:51 AM   #45
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Wink

I have to agree with everyone and putting in the oven just before you reseason it will kill anything you don't want on the pan. Cast iron also spreads the heat out more evenly that is why it cooks better and you can turn the heat off just before it is totally done and the pan will keep it hot enough to finish cooking, a good energy saver.
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Old 04-05-2005, 12:11 PM   #46
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Frying temperatures are usually above 300 degrees F. Any simering is done around the boiling temperature of water, around 212. The harmful bacteria found in food begins dying off at around 140 and is long dead at 160. So, unless you are using your cast-iron to serve cold foods, you lon't have to worry much about bacterial contamination from frying chicken, then the veggies from a stir-fry, for instance.

In addition, cast iron is as easy, or easier to maintain than is teflon. It will withstand greater temperatures (I've had mine up to 550) is not prone to damage from metal utensiles, and if seasoned initially, is as easy to clean as is teflon. The only down side is that soap will disolve the grease coating, resulting in the need for re-seasoning. But I just use hot water and a stiff-bristle scrub brush and cleaning is nearly effortless. That's not to say that I haven't abused my pans and made things stick to them. But even then, they are salvagable with a bit of elbow grease. Do the same thing to teflon and you might as well throw away the pan.

I am a huge fan of cast-iron. I like stainless with encapulated bottoms, or fully clad too. But more things get cooked in my cast iron than in any other pan type I own. I even use them for baking, broiling, and roasting chores. As a bonus, you can throw them on two good logs of a campfire without damaging the pan.

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Old 04-05-2005, 01:11 PM   #47
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mudbug
I've never done this. Lemon juice - OK for chicken or fish, but what does lemon juice bring to the taste of a hunk of beef?
I was not advising putting lemon juice in a beef roast.

I was just telling her what is acidic! Yall are funny.....
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Old 04-06-2005, 11:19 AM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mudbug
I've never done this. Lemon juice - OK for chicken or fish, but what does lemon juice bring to the taste of a hunk of beef?
i didnt mean that its a must for cooking a roast beef,but it does enhance the taste,lemon or yogurt or anything sour is always good for roasting any kind of meat...
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Old 04-06-2005, 11:53 AM   #49
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I have my mothers old cast iron skillet that she'd used for years. I always wash it with soap and water.......but never let it soak......I put it in, wash it and immed. remove it. I use oil in my cooking so the bits that are stuck to the bottom and sides pretty easily scrap away. After washing it I put it back on the stove and set it on low till no water is left. I then wipe it dry with a towel and add a touch of oil and wipe it back down. I've never had a problem with rust. I keep mine stored inside my oven.
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Old 03-08-2008, 09:28 PM   #50
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The fact that any thread concerning cast iron generates a lot of comments and opinions speaks well for its durability and usefulness. It will take the heat necessary for searing meats without damage, can go directly from the stovetop to the oven. If you do misuse it, it is repairable. Care seems to be a matter or preference, except that everyone agrees it must be seasoned. While it takes a while to heat up, once there it holds the heat with no hot spots, which is why it makes the best cornbread and ham and beans. If I had to live with only one type of cookware, it would be cast iron.
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