"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Knives
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-07-2009, 03:55 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 2
All Purpose Knife?

I am brand new to cooking, and when I mean brand new to cooking, I mean I have yet to try to cook anything. I was wondering if there is a solid all purpose knife that anyone could recommend. Just the typical knife you see food show hosts use to chop/dice just about everything up with. Any replies are greatly appreciated

__________________

__________________
zepfloyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2009, 04:36 PM   #2
Head Chef
 
Scotch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: California
Posts: 1,042
The basic knife you want is what's called a French Chef's Knife or just Chef's or Cook's Knife. It should have a blade about 8 inches long and look like this:



However, you probably also will want a smaller knife for some things, like this one with a thinner 6-inch blade:

__________________

__________________
Scotch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2009, 04:43 PM   #3
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Beautiful Brooklyn NY
Posts: 325
I agree with Scotch and use 2 knives for 90% or more
of my needs.
While most western cooks choose the classic French Chef's
or (lately) Santoku knife along with a good paring knife
my go to main knife if an 8" Chinese knife - along with my paring
knife this gets most jobs done.
__________________
anything that does not kill me makes me stronger
mike in brooklyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2009, 04:48 PM   #4
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 2
any particular brands you guys recommend? nothing to expensive, around 50-60 dollars?
__________________
zepfloyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2009, 05:03 PM   #5
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Beautiful Brooklyn NY
Posts: 325
Forschner makes an 8" Chefs knife for about $35
and it is consistantly top buy rated by America's Test Kitchen.

I am partial to Dexter Russell (American company)
and they made my Chinese knife and are major suppliers
of knives for the restaurant industry.
See below.
Dexter-Russell, Inc.
__________________
anything that does not kill me makes me stronger
mike in brooklyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2009, 08:22 AM   #6
Sous Chef
 
buzzard767's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Naples, FL & Wausau, WI
Posts: 608
In your price range ($55) I recommend a Togiharu Molybdenum Gyuto. A Gyuto is a Japanese chef's knife, shaped very much like a French Chef's knife. The steel is thinner and harder than comparable French or German knives so it cuts better and the edge lasts longer. Get a 210mm (8.2") at Korin.

__________________
buzzard767 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2009, 08:01 PM   #7
Assistant Cook
 
Grovite's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Leesburg, VA
Posts: 7
I'll second the Forschner knives. They're good and inexpensive.

Also, check out the Wusthof Gourmet line, the KAI Pure Komachi and the Kershaw 9900 series. All of those are in your price range and are well made knives.
__________________
Rock & Roll is like Mexican food. As it improves in quality, it stops being what it is.
Grovite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2009, 03:46 AM   #8
Head Chef
 
Rob Babcock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 1,281
Quote:
Originally Posted by buzzard767 View Post
In your price range ($55) I recommend a Togiharu Molybdenum Gyuto. A Gyuto is a Japanese chef's knife, shaped very much like a French Chef's knife. The steel is thinner and harder than comparable French or German knives so it cuts better and the edge lasts longer. Get a 210mm (8.2") at Korin.


The add copy seems to imply it's differentially beveled- is that the case? If so that would minimally complicate sharpening for a novice. I've been meaning to try that knife out; do you think it's a better deal the the Fujiwara FMK? The Fujiwara is only $68 at JCK.
__________________
If we're not supposed to eat animals, then how come they're made out of meat?
Rob Babcock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2009, 03:48 AM   #9
Head Chef
 
Rob Babcock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 1,281
Quote:
Originally Posted by zepfloyd View Post
I am brand new to cooking, and when I mean brand new to cooking, I mean I have yet to try to cook anything. I was wondering if there is a solid all purpose knife that anyone could recommend. Just the typical knife you see food show hosts use to chop/dice just about everything up with. Any replies are greatly appreciated
A 'chef's knife' is the primary tool for most cooks, be it pro or home cooking enthusiast. As much as I want to agree with Buzz I'm not sure if you need anything better than the Fibrox. How much will you use it? What do you anticipate cooking? That said spending a bit more on a better knife will make cooking far more pleasurable.
__________________
If we're not supposed to eat animals, then how come they're made out of meat?
Rob Babcock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2009, 06:43 AM   #10
Senior Cook
 
FincaPerlitas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: San Jose, Costa Rica, Central America
Posts: 285
I prefer traditional French/German-style forged knives. The Forschner Fibrox knives and Wusthof Gourmet knives are both stamped, not forged, and don't have the wieght and balance of a good forged knife. For an inexpensive, good-quality set of forged knives, I recommend the Calphalon Traditional series knives. You can buy a full set with an 8" chef's knife, 6" utility knife, 5" serrated utility knife (tomato knife), and a 3 1/2' paring knive, plus storage block and sharpening steel for $100 from Amazon: Amazon.com: Calphalon Traditional 6-Piece Knife Block Set: Home & Garden .

These are good knives and will serve you well for many years. Like most "knife freaks", I don't allow others to use my personal knives, and have a set of these knives for everyday use by friends and family. We've been using them for several years and they've held up extremely well to heavy use and abuse.

Another benefit is that they're open stock, so you can add to the set as desired. For our style of cooking, I've added an 8" slicer, an 8" bread knife and a 5" boning knife.

A few important tips for all knives: Never put them in the dishwasher or in the sink with other dishes. Always use a wood or soft plastic cutting board. Before each use, take 3 or 4 passes oneach side of the blade with a sharpening steel. This keeps the edge aligned and greatly extends the time between sharpening. After each use, simply wipe or hand wash them and put them back in the storage block.
__________________

__________________
"Iím going to break one of the rules of the trade here. Iím going to tell you some of the secrets of improvisation. Just remember ó itís always a good idea to follow the directions exactly the first time you try a recipe. But from then on, youíre on your own." - James Beard
FincaPerlitas is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:51 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.