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Old 02-06-2012, 02:47 AM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HistoricFoodie View Post
Typical celebrity chef marketing ploy, KF. That is not a mezzaluna.

A mezzaluna is a highly curved blade with a handle on each end. You rock it back and forth, over the food, to chop it. They come in both single and double-bladed versions.

If you get one, go for the double blade. A single bladed mezzaluna is even more awkward then your knife.

There is a learning curve involved, developling the feel for a mezzaluna. And, in general, you need a good-sized work surface. But once you become comfortable with one it's about the fastest manual way of chopping things.
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Originally Posted by HistoricFoodie View Post
Only trouble with that style, JustPlainBill, is that you just about have to use it with a wooden bowl. They're not that effective on a flat cutting board.

My Mom used one for years, and I still have it (along with the bowl she used). For me it's too much trouble to dig out a wooden bowl, and then have to clean it as well.

KG, the thing to understand is that it's just a round knife. You can chop anything with it that can be chopped with any other knife. If you don't mind using a wooden bowl, it might be the best choice for you.
You are right in regards to that knife not being a mezzaluna, but you don't have to come across so smug . Offer up something with some substance, besides an empty worded opinion.

Also, A mezzaluna is exactly that, a "half moon", so to imply that what bill posted needs a bowl is wrong. It can just as easily be worked over a flat surface, rocking back and forth, like ANY OTHER mezzaluna.
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Old 02-06-2012, 03:40 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by kitchengoddess8 View Post
Do you find it easy to use? What kinds of foods can you chop with it?
Chestnuts, walnuts, basil, pine nuts, garlic, fresh thyme, lovage, spinach, chard, chicken livers, ...
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Old 02-06-2012, 03:53 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by HistoricFoodie View Post
Only trouble with that style, JustPlainBill, is that you just about have to use it with a wooden bowl. They're not that effective on a flat cutting board.

My Mom used one for years, and I still have it (along with the bowl she used). For me it's too much trouble to dig out a wooden bowl, and then have to clean it as well.

KG, the thing to understand is that it's just a round knife. You can chop anything with it that can be chopped with any other knife. If you don't mind using a wooden bowl, it might be the best choice for you.
My mother and her mother also. I have their mezzalunas and wooden bowls which are almost historic ( 60 - 100 years old). I find them easier to store and clean and more durable than the newfangled gadgets.
The curve of the blade matches the curve of the bowl and the bowl prevents the ingredients from escaping onto the counter or table.
I use the blade in both a rocking as well as a straight up and down (chopping) motion.
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Old 02-06-2012, 06:57 AM   #34
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Wow, that sounds very cost effective, I paid over $100 just for my Wusthof 8" chef's knife, which I am definitely going to return.

KG, whether you're talking knives, dishes, or cookware, buying single-items from open stock is always more expensive than buying kits and sets. The downside is that unless you know exactly what you want, and shop around, sets aren't the best way to go for most people.

Greg, apparently, made out fine. But most of the time sets include things that you'll never use, while, at the same time, leaving out pieces that you want. And you're back to open stock anyway.

Something else to keep in mind. In this and related threads we've been using brand names. But every brand has multiple lines, with different price points.

I know that good knives can be exensive. But considering that knives are the single most important kitchen tools; and that good knives will be handed down to your grandchildren, you really shouldn't look at price so much as quality and usability.

Daddy always said, "don't be afraid to buy the best; you'll never be disappointed." That's the way you should feel about your kitchen knives.

And keep them sharp!
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Old 02-06-2012, 11:27 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TATTRAT
sometimes a knife isn't needed:
Put the nuts on a cutting board, put another cutting board on top, and tamp with a heavy #10 can.

What application are the nuts being used for?

Also, as mentioned, mezzalunas are designed for just such a thing, it just depends on the volume of nuts to be chopped/crushed. . .
I'm using them mostly to put in yogurt and sometimes cookies or muffins.
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Old 02-06-2012, 11:56 AM   #36
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I have a chef's knife that I reserve for chopping nuts and chocolate so my "good" knives won't get munked up. and for large quantities, I use the pulse button on my food processor.
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Old 02-06-2012, 07:33 PM   #37
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The mezzalunas are designed like several types of knives we give our patients with arthritis, never saw the likeness between them until now.
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Old 02-06-2012, 07:55 PM   #38
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I only recently hear of mezzalunas, but was familiar with ulus (Inuit woman's knife) Ulu - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. I guess it's a kind of obvious way to make a knife.
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Old 02-06-2012, 08:44 PM   #39
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I love my Ulu knives, best thing for chopping herbs!
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Old 02-06-2012, 08:54 PM   #40
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I love my Ulu knives, best thing for chopping herbs!
Just don't cut your hair with it! Learn something new everyday.
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