Dinner Sunday - Oct. 8

The friendliest place on the web for anyone that enjoys cooking.
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

Shunka

Head Chef
Joined
Aug 31, 2004
Messages
1,023
Location
USA,Arizona
I want to go to Katie E's house and pick Fraidy up on the way with the Au Gratin spuds!!!!! Fraidy, that is the only way I ever make them; same with the recipe for scalloped spuds. My old Betty Crocker cookbook came out in the mid 70s; is that about the same with your's?
 

FraidKnot

Washing Up
Joined
Sep 23, 2006
Messages
339
Location
Outside of Memphis, TN
Shunka said:
I want to go to Katie E's house and pick Fraidy up on the way with the Au Gratin spuds!!!!! Fraidy, that is the only way I ever make them; same with the recipe for scalloped spuds. My old Betty Crocker cookbook came out in the mid 70s; is that about the same with your's?

I have the one from the mid-70's but I learned a lot from Mom's 1951 edition, the 3-ring binder type. Hers became so bedraggled she finally threw it away (after they moved to South Carolina). I found the same edition in near perfect condition on eBay for $5! Score!
 

thumpershere2

Head Chef
Joined
Sep 13, 2004
Messages
1,285
Location
USA,Minnesota
We had baked ham with mashed potatoes and milk gravy from the ham drippings. Creamed cabbage, corn and sliced tomatoes. Fresh baked rolls.
 

Katie H

Site Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Sep 11, 2006
Messages
16,607
Location
I live in the Heartland of the United States
Katie E said:
Country-fried steak with buttermilk gravy, mashed potatoes and buttered peas. Haven't decided about dessert yet.

The country-fried steak was fantastic. It was from Emeril's book Prime Time Emeril. He called it Country-fried Steak with White Gravy. I followed the recipe exactly, except instead of using 2 cups of milk for the gravy, I used 1 cup milk and 1 cup buttermilk. Yum.

The recipe started by directing you to cook chopped bacon until crisp, then removing the bacon to paper towels to drain. Then the breaded steak was fried in the bacon fat. (Well, it is a pig fat thing!) The bacon was added later to the gravy.

Really, really great recipe. If you have the cookbook, you owe it to yourself to try this recipe.
 

FraidKnot

Washing Up
Joined
Sep 23, 2006
Messages
339
Location
Outside of Memphis, TN
Katie E said:
The country-fried steak was fantastic. It was from Emeril's book Prime Time Emeril. He called it Country-fried Steak with White Gravy. I followed the recipe exactly, except instead of using 2 cups of milk for the gravy, I used 1 cup milk and 1 cup buttermilk. Yum.

Really, really great recipe. If you have the cookbook, you owe it to yourself to try this recipe.

I don't have the cookbook. I'm curious, what cut of meat did he use for the CFS? When I make it, which is rarely, I use round steak and I beat the s*** out of it with a meat mallet! I could pay extra for the stuff they run through the tenderizer at the butcher shop, but hey, I'm frugal.

It annoys me no end when I go to a home cooking-style restaurant and they have CFS on the menu but it's nothing more than a battered ground sirloin pattie. :ohmy: That works, don't get me wrong, but real CFS is made with a cut of steak.
 

Katie H

Site Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Sep 11, 2006
Messages
16,607
Location
I live in the Heartland of the United States
FraidKnot said:
I don't have the cookbook. I'm curious, what cut of meat did he use for the CFS? When I make it, which is rarely, I use round steak and I beat the s*** out of it with a meat mallet! I could pay extra for the stuff they run through the tenderizer at the butcher shop, but hey, I'm frugal.


The recipe called for round steak, cut into equal portions, then pounded to 1/4-inch thickness. I didn't have any round steak in the freezer so I substituted cube steak.

I know what you mean about pounding the beegeepers out of meat to tenderize it. I've used everything from a mallet to the edge of a ceramic plate. That is, until Buck gave me a 48-blade jaccard tenderizer for Christmas last year. It's an awesome tool. It can make a combat boot tender. You might want to check into getting one. I use mine on almost every type of meat and/or poultry.
 

Latest posts

Top Bottom