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Old 04-28-2011, 05:27 AM   #11
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Thanks Kadesma. I think it not only tastes good but is healthy. Our garlic chives appear to be a gift from our feathered friends. They are a shade tolerant perennial that pops up in the early spring, dies back during the summer and pops back up in the fall.
That's so strange, I'd have to buy them and plant to get the garlic chives. Think i'll give it a try
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Old 04-28-2011, 09:04 AM   #12
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We sure could. Did they teach you to make the wine? I'd love to learn how.
kades

I did not learn to make the wine but I was just looking at some of the recipes for it on the internet. It uses the dandelion flowers, orange juice, lemon juice, lime and ginger -- sounds interesting and fun to try.

How to Make Dandelion Wine: 10 steps - wikiHow
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Old 05-02-2011, 07:33 PM   #13
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Okay my lettuce is coming up, it's an inch high!!! (woo hoo a whole inch!)
I want to learn dandelion salad (to mix with my regular lettuces).....so, can anyone give me instruction on picking the leaves? No poisons sprayed on my acre.
Are they better very very small.....how small, or do you only pick them in the spring? Before they go to heads for the flowers? Wash it and slice it up? Teach me? Thank you in advance!
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Old 05-03-2011, 05:38 AM   #14
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Be forewarned that it is somewhat bitter, akin to curly endive. It's best picked in spring before flowers have gone to seed and leaves are less than 4 inches long. Rinse, dry and break into pieces < 1.5".
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Old 05-03-2011, 03:09 PM   #15
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I've never found then to be bitter, but everyone has different take on these greens. Some find them to be weeds and others find a lucious salad. I never use balsamic on them but a home made vinegar that my DH's cousin made and with some evoo salt and papper it's great. I never mix them with other lettuces but I do like some chives added to the red onions yum
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Old 05-03-2011, 03:44 PM   #16
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Below is a link to a relatively comprehensive treatise on dandelions-
Making dandelions palatable by John Kallas, Ph.D Issue #82
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Old 05-03-2011, 04:27 PM   #17
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Below is a link to a relatively comprehensive treatise on dandelions-
Making dandelions palatable by John Kallas, Ph.D Issue #82
Interesting read. I must be one of those who bitter doesn't register on I love the taste of dandelion greens, I've had them boiled and topped with crisp bacon, they are ok but I prefer the sliced raw ones. I just wonder why the store bought kind are so mild?
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Old 05-03-2011, 05:05 PM   #18
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Below is a link to a relatively comprehensive treatise on dandelions-
Making dandelions palatable by John Kallas, Ph.D Issue #82
Thanks for the link. I have tried dandelion greens several times and "Yacht, pituey, spit-spit-spit, blah!" was pretty much my reaction too. I think I'll give them another try this spring.

I tried a lot of kinds of wild greens, and with the exception of mustard greens, they were all, "Like spinach, only worse."
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Old 05-03-2011, 05:24 PM   #19
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Interesting read. I must be one of those who bitter doesn't register on I love the taste of dandelion greens, I've had them boiled and topped with crisp bacon, they are ok but I prefer the sliced raw ones. I just wonder why the store bought kind are so mild?
kadesma
I have a pretty high tolerance for bitter and a low one for sweet. For example I prefer beers with a high hops content. Apparently many people, particularly Americans, find bitterness to be yukky and sweetness to be yummy but for example, to me, the sweetness of Sweppes tonic water, as of late, more than offsets the desirability of the bitterness of the quinine.
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Old 05-03-2011, 05:29 PM   #20
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I have a pretty high tolerance for bitter and a low one for sweet. For example I prefer beers with a high hops content. Apparently many people, particularly Americans, find bitterness to be yukky and sweetness to be yummy but for example, to me, the sweetness of Sweppes tonic water, as of late, more than offsets the desirability of the bitterness of the quinine.
That's funny. I really dislike bitter, but I dislike tonic water for its sweetness far more than for its bitterness. Most people think I'm nuts when I say that tonic water is too sweet.
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