"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Desserts, Sweets & Cookies & Candy > Cobblers & Crisps
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-12-2008, 01:03 AM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 2
What is a cobbler

What is a 'cobbler'? I have seen this in receipe books but never really tired making it

__________________

__________________
messers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2008, 01:47 AM   #2
Head Chef
 
Mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Georgia
Posts: 1,810
Here in the US, it's a dessert that is made from fruit that has a crust that rises to the top when cooked. In the UK, I understnd it is something entirely different. Here is a picture of peach cobbler:
Attached Images
 
__________________

__________________
www.Mamas-Southern-Cooking.com
Mama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2008, 12:45 PM   #3
Hospitality Queen
 
jkath's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Southern California
Posts: 11,448
My grandma made the most amazing blackberry cobbler in the world!

and just like Mama said, there's a crust on top, and cooked fruit underneath. Sometimes the crust rises, but others (like Grandma's) had the topping put directly on the top. In any sense, it's one of the greatest desserts, I think. They're always best, still hot, with a scoop of homemade vanilla ice cream on top.

That said, here's probably the easiest "cobbler" if you want to try something quick: Quickie Peach Cobbler
__________________
Come visit my foodie blog: www.SockmonkeysKitchen.com
This week's topic: Pinterest and Potatoes
jkath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2008, 01:03 PM   #4
The Dude Abides
 
TATTRAT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bermuda Native in D.C./NoVA
Posts: 5,324
Send a message via AIM to TATTRAT Send a message via Yahoo to TATTRAT Send a message via Skype™ to TATTRAT
and they fix shoes

cob·bler Pronunciation: \ˈkä-blər\ Function:noun Etymology:Middle English cobelereDate:13th century
1: a mender or maker of shoes and often of other leather goods
2archaic : a clumsy workman
3: a tall iced drink consisting usually of wine, rum, or whiskey and sugar garnished with mint or a slice of lemon or orange
4: a deep-dish fruit dessert with a thick top crust

I believe you are looking for the 4th version
__________________
flickr
TATTRAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2008, 03:01 PM   #5
Hospitality Queen
 
jkath's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Southern California
Posts: 11,448
Quote:
Originally Posted by TATTRAT View Post
and they fix shoes


Quote:
Originally Posted by TATTRAT View Post
3: a tall iced drink consisting usually of wine, rum, or whiskey and sugar garnished with mint or a slice of lemon or orange
I don't know about you, but that one sounds really tasty on this nice June day!

(darn karma - I can't give you any till I spread the love around more)
__________________
Come visit my foodie blog: www.SockmonkeysKitchen.com
This week's topic: Pinterest and Potatoes
jkath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2008, 01:49 AM   #6
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 337
Quote:
Originally Posted by messers View Post
What is a 'cobbler'? I have seen this in receipe books but never really tired making it

Hi Messers,
There are 2 types of "cobblers" - a savoury one and a sweet one.

Each consists of 2 layers.

Savoury one - which uses a rich mince/ground beef/other meat or vegetable stew as the base upon which one places scones and bakes.

A sweet one, which requires a base of stewed fruit upon which one places scones and bakes.

Nothing could be simpler!

Regards,
Archiduc
__________________
archiduc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2008, 02:13 AM   #7
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by messers View Post
What is a 'cobbler'? I have seen this in receipe books but never really tired making it
1. A guy or gal who makes shoes. no Kidding.

2. From Webster's - 1: a mender or maker of shoes and often of other leather goods2archaic : a clumsy workman3: a tall iced drink consisting usually of wine, rum, or whiskey and sugar garnished with mint or a slice of lemon or orange4: a deep-dish fruit dessert with a thick top crust.

I believe number 4 is what you are looking for. Cobblers usually have some type of fruit on the bottom, such as cherry, peaches, apple, etc. Then, a pastry crust is made on top of that, made flour, sugar, egg, salt, water, vanilla, and sometimes spices such as nutmeg, allspice, cinnamon, etc.

A crisp is simialr to a cobler, but with a crumbled top crust made usually from flour, sugar, salt, water, vanilla, and sometimes spices such as nutmeg, allspice, cinnamon, etc. It is mixed with oil, lard, shortening, or butter and often broken walnuts or pecans, and then crumbled and sprinkled over the fruit and baked together.

A Betty (brown betty) is made from baked fruit, breadcrumbs, and spices. It is reffered to as a pudding in the British use of the word, which is like a pie with no top-crust, or like bread pudding.

Ahh rats! or should I say TattRat! I just looked at all of the postings in this thread. Seems Tatt beat me to Webster's.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2008, 03:16 PM   #8
Cook
 
zzrdvark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Duh, right here! :P
Posts: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiduc View Post
Hi Messers,
There are 2 types of "cobblers" - a savoury one and a sweet one.

Each consists of 2 layers.

Savoury one - which uses a rich mince/ground beef/other meat or vegetable stew as the base upon which one places scones and bakes.

A sweet one, which requires a base of stewed fruit upon which one places scones and bakes.

Nothing could be simpler!

Regards,
Archiduc
I think the sweet variety is what's most common in the USA, and people in the UK a type of pie known as a cobbler (which would be the savory one), though most people in the US wouldn't consider a "cobbler". (And I suppose that UK residents wouldn't consider a sweet cobbler a cobbler. )
__________________

__________________
zzrdvark is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:49 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.