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Old 10-20-2009, 12:22 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Randy_ View Post
Really !!
Ooooh well I will be on the hunt for one then
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Old 10-20-2009, 12:34 PM   #32
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This question came up over at Cooking.com a while ago and I did a little reading on the INTERNET. I don't recall exactly how much iron was transfered from the skillet to the food It was not a great deal.....but I guess every little bit helps and if you were only borderline, it might be the difference between taking a supplement and not.

Do an Internet search if you are interested in details..
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Old 10-21-2009, 10:43 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by Randy_ View Post
This question came up over at Cooking.com a while ago and I did a little reading on the INTERNET. I don't recall exactly how much iron was transfered from the skillet to the food It was not a great deal.....but I guess every little bit helps and if you were only borderline, it might be the difference between taking a supplement and not.

Do an Internet search if you are interested in details..

I will do :)

Thanks for the tip Results day is tomorrow too so fingers crossed
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Old 10-25-2009, 07:21 AM   #34
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Hi Fuzzy !

Here are some information that may be helpful when you take supplementation.
Recommended Dietary Allowances for Iron for a healthy adult is 8mg/day for a male, and 18 mg/day for a female.
Iron is found in animal foods that originally contained hemoglobin, such as red meats, fish, and poultry; it is called heme iron.
Iron in plant foods such as lentils and beans is called nonheme iron. It is important to know that Heme iron is absorbed better than nonheme iron.
Iron absorption means the amount of dietary iron that the body stores and uses from food.
A healthy adult absorbs about 10% to 15% of dietary iron, but the individual absorption is influenced by the type of iron and many other factors.
Absorption of heme iron from meat proteins is efficient.
On the other hand tannins (found in tea), calcium, polyphenols, and phytates (found in legumes and whole grains) can decrease absorption of nonheme iron. For exemple if you eat a bowl of ready to eat cereals with milk ( contains calcium) The absorption of Iron contaned in the cereals may be decreased.
But Meat proteins and vitamin C will improve the absorption of nonheme iron.
In case of anemia, supplementation is highly indicated when diet alone cannot restore deficient iron.
The amount of iron absorbed decreases with increasing doses, that is why the doses of iron supplements are high (50mg to 60 mg of iron for a tablet)
It is important for anyone who considers taking suplementation to discuss their potential need for iron supplements with their physician. For a healthy person dietary supplements,cannot replace a healthful diet.

Hope you will feel very good !

All the best !
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Old 10-27-2009, 06:39 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by YourDietitian View Post
Hi Fuzzy !

Here are some information that may be helpful when you take supplementation.
Recommended Dietary Allowances for Iron for a healthy adult is 8mg/day for a male, and 18 mg/day for a female.
Iron is found in animal foods that originally contained hemoglobin, such as red meats, fish, and poultry; it is called heme iron.
Iron in plant foods such as lentils and beans is called nonheme iron. It is important to know that Heme iron is absorbed better than nonheme iron.
Iron absorption means the amount of dietary iron that the body stores and uses from food.
A healthy adult absorbs about 10% to 15% of dietary iron, but the individual absorption is influenced by the type of iron and many other factors.
Absorption of heme iron from meat proteins is efficient.
On the other hand tannins (found in tea), calcium, polyphenols, and phytates (found in legumes and whole grains) can decrease absorption of nonheme iron. For exemple if you eat a bowl of ready to eat cereals with milk ( contains calcium) The absorption of Iron contaned in the cereals may be decreased.
But Meat proteins and vitamin C will improve the absorption of nonheme iron.
In case of anemia, supplementation is highly indicated when diet alone cannot restore deficient iron.
The amount of iron absorbed decreases with increasing doses, that is why the doses of iron supplements are high (50mg to 60 mg of iron for a tablet)
It is important for anyone who considers taking suplementation to discuss their potential need for iron supplements with their physician. For a healthy person dietary supplements,cannot replace a healthful diet.

Hope you will feel very good !

All the best !

Hi Thank You so much for that insight! You will be glad to know that I got my tests at my last blood test and the results were good so I am now allowed to stop taking the supplements and now need to concentrate on the diet part of it!

I have another blood test in 3 months at which point they will see if I have managed to maintian it well enough! Fingers crossed hey?
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Old 11-03-2010, 01:44 PM   #36
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Thread is kinda old but gonna reply, so I don't forget I looked it up later
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