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Old 03-05-2012, 05:25 PM   #21
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Well' I'll be danged. I trotted out to the kitchen. I have a half-gallon paper carton that I am finishing up and a quart in a plastic bottle that I haven't opened up yet. Paper carton = Ultra Pasteurized. Plastic Bottle = Pasteurized. Paper Carton expires in two weeks. Plastic Bottle expires next week. And I just bought the plastic bottle. Since I don't drink that much milk, I am going to buy milk by the quart in a plastic bottle.

The majority of dairy farms have Holstein cows. They give the most milk by the pound. The average Holstein gives 25 pounds per milking. If the diary farm is more interested in selling cream for butter, they have Jersey's or Guernseys. Their milk has a higher buttermilk fat content per pound. After the separation of the cream from the milk, the milk is sold for skim milk or as animal feed.
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Old 03-05-2012, 05:33 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
Oh-oh, I'm starting to toy with the thought that maybe what I need is is a dairy cow...
Or a goat.
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Old 03-05-2012, 05:37 PM   #23
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Oh-oh, I'm starting to toy with the thought that maybe what I need is is a dairy cow...
Remember that dairy animals require 24/7 care. Dairy cows need to be constantly monitored (at least in the states) against diseases that can be passed from animal to human. (TB) Vets are very expensive. You don't get to take a vacaion. They have to be milked every day, twice a day. And hiring someone to come in and do it for you while you are on vacation is expensive. As much as I love living on a farm, a dairy animal is the last thing I would have. So unless you are willing to buy a very expensive milking machine, a separator tank and other machinery, you will have to get up at five every morning, even in the freezing cold of winter and go out to the barn, twice a day and milk by hands. Warm those hands. Cows hate cold hands on their teats. They can gve you a nasty kick. Or a quick squish in the face with their dirty fecas covered tails. You also have to wash their bag with a mild solution of bleach and water, then rinse them thoroughly. The same rules apply for goats. And goats love to butt you when your back is turned. Oh yeah. You will need to dehorn the cow with chemicals after you saw off the most part.

Still want a diary cow?
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Old 03-05-2012, 05:40 PM   #24
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Remember that dairy animals require 24/7 care. Dairy cows need to be constantly monitored (at least in the states) against diseases that can be passed from animal to human. (TB) Vets are very expensive. You don't get to take a vacaion. They have to be milked every day, twice a day. And hiring someone to come in and do it for you while you are on vacation is expensive. As much as I love living on a farm, a dairy animal is the last thing I would have. So unless you are willing to buy a very expensive milking machine, a separator tank and other machinery, you will have to get up at five every morning, even in the freezing cold of winter and go out to the barn, twice a day and milk by hands. Warm those hands. Cows hate cold hands on their teats. They can gve you a nasty kick. Or a quick squish in the face with their dirty fecas covered tails. You also have to wash their bag with a mild solution of bleach and water, then rinse them thoroughly. The same rules apply for goats. And goats love to butt you when your back is turned. Oh yeah. You will need to dehorn the cow with chemicals after you saw of the most part.

Still want a diary cow?
What do you have to do for the cows you eat?
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Old 03-05-2012, 05:49 PM   #25
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What do you have to do for the cows you eat?
If it is a bull, castrate them as babies. Then put them out to pasture. If it is a heifer, put it out to pasture. You also have to tag them, clip their ears and attach a large plastic number showing their lineage. Then in late fall, you send them to market to go to a feed lot. A practice I wholeheartedly disapprove of. Corn is not a natural food of bovines. I would rather keep it on the farm or range until they reached the desired weight. That's what we did with the heifer we had in Texas. We called the slaughter truck in. In exchange for part of the fee, we let him take all the parts we didn't or wouldn't use. e.i. brains, intestines, kidneys, etc. We did keep the liver.
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Old 03-05-2012, 06:06 PM   #26
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Those sound easier...

I prefer steak to milk.

BTW.. I like my milk cold.
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Old 03-05-2012, 06:30 PM   #27
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Pasteurization was desperately important once. But I suspect that on most farms, a microbe doesn't stand a chance of making a living in a cow. But I'm okay with pasteurization for the mass market of a product that has to be distributed before testing could be completed. I don't know much about ultrafiltered milk, but is supposedly tastes better than pasteurized. And I assume dairies might have one less step if the fine filter also homogenizes. It's go to be better than the heat treatment.

In the end, I'm okay with letting someone else do the milking.
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Old 03-05-2012, 06:48 PM   #28
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Pasteurization was desperately important once. But I suspect that on most farms, a microbe doesn't stand a chance of making a living in a cow. But I'm okay with pasteurization for the mass market of a product that has to be distributed before testing could be completed. I don't know much about ultra filtered milk, but is supposedly tastes better than pasteurized. And I assume dairies might have one less step if the fine filter also homogenizes. It's go to be better than the heat treatment.

In the end, I'm okay with letting someone else do the milking.
Sorry, I want my milk pasteurized. TB is still prevalent and on the rise. Cows, whether for home use or commercial sale, need to be tested on a regular basis. It is as contagious among cows as well as humans. When I lived in Washington State, there were stores that had a special license to sell raw milk. It is so much richer than homogenized and pasteurized milk. But in drinking or using it, you are exposing yourself to TB. I used to go into the separating room at the Fair and get just enough cream for my morning coffee before it was processed. It only took a small drop for my coffee. The cream had floated to the top of the tank of milk as it was coming from the cows. It was still steaming from the body heat of the cows. I knew that every one of the cows at the Fair had been tested for TB. Their certificate was posted in each stall of each cow. So I had no qualms about using their product. But what was being sold in the stores, only had a certificate for permission for sale. Not where it came from. Or when they had been tested for TB.
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Old 03-05-2012, 06:51 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GLC View Post
Pasteurization was desperately important once. But I suspect that on most farms, a microbe doesn't stand a chance of making a living in a cow. But I'm okay with pasteurization for the mass market of a product that has to be distributed before testing could be completed. I don't know much about ultrafiltered milk, but is supposedly tastes better than pasteurized. And I assume dairies might have one less step if the fine filter also homogenizes. It's go to be better than the heat treatment.

In the end, I'm okay with letting someone else do the milking.
I remember reading that pasteurization kills more Vitamin C than is produced in California's entire citrus crop.

If I am not mistaken, the really big deal about pasteurization was that it stopped people from getting tuberculosis from cows. Nowadays, that isn't a problem.

Also, nowadays we have aseptic and air tight packaging, as well as much better refrigeration. It probably isn't necessary any more.

The filtered milk here in Quebec is still pasteurized.
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Old 03-05-2012, 07:42 PM   #30
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I like my milk cold enough to cause brain freeze.

I prefer it in glass bottles. We still have one local dairy chain that uses returnable glass bottles. They also make some fine holiday milk flavors, now it is green mint flavor for St. Patrick's day. I also like milk from those old stainless steel coolers that whip into a froth when they dispense it.

Remember when the milkman brought the milk in the winter and when it froze the top would rise up under a cylinder of frozen cream?

Now I drink skim milk and try to pretend I like it!

My grandmother used to feed it to the pigs!
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