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Old 06-18-2009, 09:50 AM   #11
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The Smudging Ceremony

Smudging is a nice use of your excess Sage when you are not cooking with it and also might get you in the right frame of mind to do great in the kitchen.

It's use reminds me of a Catholic service (I'm not Catholic) and the priest is waving this container (smudge pot) on a chain as it is smoking. I assume it is the same purpose.

If you live near the West Coast and its deserts you can get Sage by just stopping along the side of the road and getting it.
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Old 06-18-2009, 10:11 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by mcnerd View Post
I like using fresh sage to "smudge".
We smudge with sage and sweetgrass. Sage is a wonderful herb for traditional uses, as well as for flavoring things. Thanks for bringing that tip to life for everyone who might not know of this practice.

My tip isn't cullinary, but a bit of horticultural knowledge. Sage is actually a member of the mint family of plants. Notice its "square tube" shaped stalk. It's the only mint that I can stomach, and I love it.

Sage also has health benefits aplenty. Here are a few addresses you might find interesting: Sage: Medicinal Properties of Sage | Salvia | Salvia Officinails

Medicinal Uses of Sage

Sage

Sage is indeed a very useful and flavorful plant. I personally think a spice pantry isn't complete without it.

Also, it is easy to grow in pots, on a window sill. You will find that many of the herbs and spices we take for granted have beneficial properties.

In my Native America heritage, (don't know if my European bloodlines appreciated the herb as much. But I do know that much of Mediteranean Europe does.) sage is a sacred plant. Seems that some of my ancestors knew what they were doing.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 06-18-2009, 10:14 AM   #13
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GW, I've never heard of sweetgrass. Is that an herb? Do you grow it from seed or plants or cuttings? What flavor does it impart to the food? Sorry for the 20 questions.
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Old 06-18-2009, 10:18 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnerd View Post
The Smudging Ceremony

Smudging is a nice use of your excess Sage when you are not cooking with it and also might get you in the right frame of mind to do great in the kitchen.

It's use reminds me of a Catholic service (I'm not Catholic) and the priest is waving this container (smudge pot) on a chain as it is smoking. I assume it is the same purpose.

If you live near the West Coast and its deserts you can get Sage by just stopping along the side of the road and getting it.
Sweet sage grows wild in the Great Lakes region as well. "Tis a wonderful thing.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 06-18-2009, 10:43 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by licia View Post
GW, I've never heard of sweetgrass. Is that an herb? Do you grow it from seed or plants or cuttings? What flavor does it impart to the food? Sorry for the 20 questions.
Wikipedia has an informative article on sweetgrass and its uses, thought it doesnt' mention that the Great Lakes region also has native sweetgrass.

My Native American Heritage is that of Chippewa, or Ojibwa. In fact, my mother's maiden name was Ojibwa. On my father's side, there is Cherokee in the mix ( have 1/4 blood quantum for both, then throw in another 1/4 German, followed by Scottish, Irish, and a hint of French, yep, that's me, a regular mutt). Sweetgrass is harvested by many in my tribe (Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians).

It's funny though. To look at me, you wouldn't guess that I had any Native American in me. I had white-blonde hair aas a child, which turned darker as I grew older to it's now medium brunette color, and have blue eyes. Two of my sisters look nearly 100% Native American, and one sister looks 100% Irish. We all had the same mother, and my odest sister and I shared the same father (Mom divorced my Dad when I was about 3 and I lived with her and my step-father during the weekdays, and with my Dad on the weekends). My mother looked very Ojibwa, espcially as she grew older. I was the only blonde-haired, blue-eyed one of the bunch. I used to get some good-natured ribbing by relatives and freinds of the family that I must have been the mailman's kid. But my Dad had green eyes and had light-brown hair as a child. And as I said, my mother's father was full-blodded German, with her mother being full-blooded Ojibwa. On my father's side, there is probably some black in the family as well, thoigh I don't know if I have any in my direct bloodline. Cherokees often intermaried with African/American. So I am truly a man of many races, and consider all of them equal in value. I am a child of my Creator, and all other titles were created by mankind, and aren't so important.

Wow! Did I ever get off-topic. Sorry 'bout that. Here's the link to that sweetgrass article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweetgrass I'm gonna see if I can be more useful on another thread now.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 06-18-2009, 11:53 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix View Post
mcnerd, smudging? As in purifying smudging? I don't know much about it and I don't want to hijack, I just wanted to know how it worked.
Yes, purifying smudging, I am sure Mcnerd meant. After you thoroughly clean a room you can cleanse it further by burning dried sage in an abalone shell and taking it to the outer corners of the room. Lots of folks I have known use this technique especially when they have just moved into a new home or apartment.

Hope that explains things....
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Old 06-18-2009, 03:15 PM   #17
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Thanks all. I like to learn a little something new each day and I think I'm good for a couple of days now. Much appreciated!
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Old 06-18-2009, 08:26 PM   #18
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Sage and garlic go well with squash (winter type), like pumpin in the aforementioned post. It really helps change the pace of the usual cinnamon/ginger squash flavoring. I also like it with garlic and butter as a 'sauce' for a ricotta gnocchi that I make.
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Old 07-28-2009, 07:42 PM   #19
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Question Tips for Harvesting Sage?

I could ask this on my gardening forum too, but you guys are a little quicker on the draw.

I have a Sage plant new to me this year, and so far it only has one main stem with lots of big leaves at the bottom. If I only want a little bit of sage, should I just pull off one of the big leaves? Will a new stem form from that?

Or should I cut from the top to prevent flowering? Or should I cut quite a bit and dry it, to promote bifurcation (getting two stems?)

And for a soup broth (chicken wild rice), should I just toss in a fresh whole leaf? Or does it need to be dried? Or cut?

Thanks!
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Old 07-29-2009, 10:15 AM   #20
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The sagebrush that grows in wild in the dry west is not the same plant as the herb sage that you put in turkey gravy.

Sagebrush is an artimesia (like dusty miller or sweet annie)--herbal sage is salvia.

Don't go out in the desert and pick sagebrush for your stuffing--the flavor won't be the same.

Use the desert sagebrush for your smudging needs :)--it smells wonderful.
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