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Old 01-02-2009, 02:47 AM   #91
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We have angel food ministry through our church and I'm going to try them and see how it works - there are several options and I've noticed a couple of items that we wouldn't use so I'll donate them to the food pantry at church. I've never been one to stick to a list but with groceries going higher I need to start doing that. Another thing I'm going to do this year is: the amount saved on the bottom of the sales ticket, I'm going to transfer to my savings account.
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Old 01-03-2009, 01:54 AM   #92
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I grow a lot of my own veggies and herbs, which helps immensely. My father is a farmer, and he also has a neighbor who has steers and he and the guy swap off help and Dad gives me lots of meat, stored in my parents' freezer.
And I am on a limited budget, so I go to the Dollar Store and collect and use coupons in grocery stores. The church I go to has a coupon box and we can get tons of coupons there. It comes in handy with cat and dog food! Also, we have a local feed and seed store, and pet food is pretty cheap in bulk. I can go online and get coupons too, which helps.
I don't use processed food or pre-packaged foods, and I cook everything from scratch. It's a lot of work sometimes but it pays off in the end.
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Old 01-06-2009, 02:42 AM   #93
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I plan my meals according to whats on sale at the supermarkets, buy only sale items, (KingSoopers, a division of Krogers and Albersons) and for fresh veggies, fruits, I hit up a place called sunflower farmers market which sells mostly local grown produce. For meats, fish, and exotic stuff I go to HMart, which is a really big asian food market with a fishmonger and butcher in the store. Prices for the meats and fish can't be beat that I've found in my area plus quality is excellent. Luckily one of the supermarkets is on the way home from work, and the other two places are close to me sort of. I usually do a circuit on my day off to save gas money.

Buy bulk staples, it costs a bit more initially, but you can make alot of stuff also.
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Old 01-06-2009, 03:24 AM   #94
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Rice and Lentils, Rice and Beans, Dirty Rice, Macaroni, growing fresh produce (in season), hunting, fishing, and making my own bread. That is how I lower my bill.
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Old 01-09-2009, 02:32 PM   #95
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wanted to make spaghetti last night.......ran by a local grocery and bought their name brand sauce for under $2.........extremely bland......added a quarter cup of red wine, some garlic powder, onion flakes, and dried oregano.....Jimmy Dean sausage (bought the low fat) was on sale and that was browned first before adding the sauce and add ins.... and the sourdough bread was half-priced as it was the end of the day......cut off the ends of the bread as they were hard and wrapped in foil and baked in a 350F preheated oven for about 12 minutes.....not a crumb was left....many stores will discount their fresh bakery products after 5pm......all you can do is ask..........
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Old 01-15-2009, 08:15 PM   #96
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Originally Posted by azfred View Post
buy what you eat, eat what you buy. when canned goods go on sale dirt cheap stock up
That's the truth, the thing is, if you want to save money by buying healthy legumes, for instance, you have to plan a meal of it occasionally. I do this weekly, instead of winging it and sometime I have hummus, sometimes bean soup, sometimes pea soup, sometimes, chili, or how about a falafel? I always make more than one meal of it, and freeze it in containers for meals, then I have it when I need a quick meal. If you don't use the inexpensive healthy ingredients, you're filling up on more expensive ingredients. Work it! Work it, it's good for you! The food you buy, is the food that runs through your kitchen is the food that runs through your veins, it's your health.
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Rice and Lentils, Rice and Beans, Dirty Rice, Macaroni, growing fresh produce (in season), hunting, fishing, and making my own bread. That is how I lower my bill.
Here too! Except for bread, I don't each much bread and what I eat is whole grained. Brown rice is a great thing. Oatmeal too, I've been having it most mornings at work, with Ceylon Cinnamon from Penzeys.
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Old 01-16-2009, 09:19 AM   #97
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Originally Posted by blissful View Post
That's the truth, the thing is, if you want to save money by buying healthy legumes, for instance, you have to plan a meal of it occasionally. I do this weekly, instead of winging it and sometime I have hummus, sometimes bean soup, sometimes pea soup, sometimes, chili, or how about a falafel? I always make more than one meal of it, and freeze it in containers for meals, then I have it when I need a quick meal. If you don't use the inexpensive healthy ingredients, you're filling up on more expensive ingredients. Work it! Work it, it's good for you! The food you buy, is the food that runs through your kitchen is the food that runs through your veins, it's your health.

Here too! Except for bread, I don't each much bread and what I eat is whole grained. Brown rice is a great thing. Oatmeal too, I've been having it most mornings at work, with Ceylon Cinnamon from Penzeys.
I agree, we eat a lot of dried beans in the winter and some in the summer. I have kidney beans simmering right now for an upcoming chili.

And I do exactly the same thing, oatmeal with Penzeys Ceylon cinnamon!
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Old 01-16-2009, 09:30 AM   #98
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I agree, we eat a lot of dried beans in the winter and some in the summer. I have kidney beans simmering right now for an upcoming chili.

And I do exactly the same thing, oatmeal with Penzeys Ceylon cinnamon!
Our 'bean dish' this week, I made the garbanzo beans and made a bunch of kinds of hummus.
I'm having my oatmeal right now, the cinnamon really 'makes it'. Have a great day!
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Old 01-18-2009, 07:15 PM   #99
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I used to just go to one grocery store but found myself disappointed with the selection ( and prices! ) of the meat and produce there.

Now it's all about eating locally and shopping the sales. We go to a butcher weekly and spend the same amount every week regardless of whether we need it or not ( what we don't need stocks the freezer ) and stock up on whatever we like that is on sale that week. We bought a deep freezer for our apartment and despite the small increase in our hydro bill we are actually saving money on our food bills every month. I was really surprised because I was certain that we would buy MORE stuff to fill the freezer but it hasn't worked out that way .

For vegetables and fruit we go to local orchards , farmers and farmer markets when its possible. When it's not we buy what is in season at the grocery store.

Our grocery bill has decreased significantly from when I spent less time at home , because now I have more time to cook and most processed or packaged things have been completely eliminated from our kitchen unless it's on sale or we really want it .
I bake all of our sweets and most other bread products aside from picking up a loaf of fresh Italian or a ciabatta when I walk past it and can't resist.

Another thing that has cut our grocery bill is just buying food there. I buy toiletries at Shoppers Drug Mart even though its not as convenient as buying it at the grocery store, it's cheaper and just a block or two away. For paper towels, laundry soap etc, I ll go to Zellers where its cheaper and yet still convenient. Don't get me wrong, I"m not the lady driving about on Saturday mornings with the stack of grocery sale flyers in the passenger seat.
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Old 01-18-2009, 09:59 PM   #100
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Originally Posted by Deathbysoup View Post
I used to just go to one grocery store but found myself disappointed with the selection ( and prices! ) of the meat and produce there.

Now it's all about eating locally and shopping the sales. We go to a butcher weekly and spend the same amount every week regardless of whether we need it or not ( what we don't need stocks the freezer ) and stock up on whatever we like that is on sale that week. We bought a deep freezer for our apartment and despite the small increase in our hydro bill we are actually saving money on our food bills every month. I was really surprised because I was certain that we would buy MORE stuff to fill the freezer but it hasn't worked out that way .

For vegetables and fruit we go to local orchards , farmers and farmer markets when its possible. When it's not we buy what is in season at the grocery store.

Our grocery bill has decreased significantly from when I spent less time at home , because now I have more time to cook and most processed or packaged things have been completely eliminated from our kitchen unless it's on sale or we really want it .
I bake all of our sweets and most other bread products aside from picking up a loaf of fresh Italian or a ciabatta when I walk past it and can't resist.

Another thing that has cut our grocery bill is just buying food there. I buy toiletries at Shoppers Drug Mart even though its not as convenient as buying it at the grocery store, it's cheaper and just a block or two away. For paper towels, laundry soap etc, I ll go to Zellers where its cheaper and yet still convenient. Don't get me wrong, I"m not the lady driving about on Saturday mornings with the stack of grocery sale flyers in the passenger seat.

how odd i would follow u in this thread. i have decided to eat more soup for dinner. the campbells local harvest ones. with or without a grilled cheese sandwich it is a filling meal. i do like the french onion one and i melt provolan cheese in it and serve with toasted seed bread. i think i can save money and it certainly is easy to make. one can is two meals for me. wish me luck
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