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Old 07-12-2015, 12:28 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I would want my scraps too. OTH, maybe that's the "charge" for cutting it up to your specifications.

That's sort of the explanation I got the first time I bought a loin there and asked for my scraps.
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Old 07-12-2015, 12:44 PM   #32
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I remember buying a bagful of chicken breasts (bone-in). I asked the butcher to debone them and save me the bones. He didn't believe me. Why on earth would I want the bones?
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Old 07-12-2015, 01:25 PM   #33
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I remember buying a bagful of chicken breasts (bone-in). I asked the butcher to debone them and save me the bones. He didn't believe me. Why on earth would I want the bones?
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Old 07-12-2015, 02:49 PM   #34
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I remember buying a bagful of chicken breasts (bone-in). I asked the butcher to debone them and save me the bones. He didn't believe me. Why on earth would I want the bones?
Like asking if they have any fish frames to make fish stock.
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Old 07-14-2015, 01:24 AM   #35
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I've opted out of having a butcher take a roast and slice it for me. I just bought a Top Round roast on sale at $3.99 lb. I wanted to try this cut of roast for jerky instead of a London Broil (which is just the lower slab of a Bottom Roast) or the too expensive Flank Steak. When I unwrapped the 2.65 lb. Top Round, there was quite a bit of fat that needed to be carefully cut off, which they don't show you when they package it. Also, a top round roast is somewhat cleaved in parts, which means I have to cut those areas apart, which is fine. It'll be a little harder to get uniform thick slices, but I'll manage with the help of my newly arrived jerky cutting board and 10" knife they provide. That's why I opted not to have the butcher cut off the fat and slice it for me...I can do it better I believe. Afterwards I ended up with just over 2 lbs. of trimmed meat from a Top Round roast that started out at 2.65 lbs. for $10.50 (on sale at $3.99 a lb.)
That ends up to about $5 a lb. for my jerky meat after trimming and before drying. Not bad, not economically great either. Top Round is supposed to have more flavor than Bottom Round and is considerably cheaper than Flank Steak for jerky. Btw...packaged jerky costs $6.99 for a 3 oz. package!

Yes...I have a question.

I had some pieces that were too irregularly shaped to cut into thin slices, so I pounded them thin and flat with a meat hammer. Is that OK to do for making beef jerky? Anyone recommend against it? Does it possibly mess with the jerky? I have more irregular jerky meat to prepare tonight, not pounded out or dried yet.
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Old 07-14-2015, 01:33 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by Caslon View Post
I've opted out of having a butcher take a roast and slice it for me. I just bought a Top Round roast on sale at $3.99 lb. I wanted to try this cut of roast for jerky instead of a London Broil (which is just the lower slab of a Bottom Roast) or the too expensive Flank Steak. When I unwrapped the 2.65 lb. Top Round, there was quite a bit of fat that needed to be carefully cut off, which they don't show you when they package it. Also, a top round roast is somewhat cleaved in parts, which means I have to cut those areas apart, which is fine. It'll be a little harder to get uniform thick slices, but I'll manage with the help of my newly arrived jerky cutting board and 10" knife they provide. That's why I opted not to have the butcher cut off the fat and slice it for me...I can do it better I believe. Afterwards I ended up with just over 2 lbs. of trimmed meat from a Top Round roast that started out at 2.65 lbs. for $10.50 (on sale at $3.99 a lb.)
That ends up to about $5 a lb. for my jerky meat after trimming and before drying. Not bad, not economically great either. Top Round is supposed to have more flavor than Bottom Round and is considerably cheaper than Flank Steak for jerky. Btw...packaged jerky costs $6.99 for a 3 oz. package!

Yes...I have a question.

I had some pieces that were too irregularly shaped to cut into thin slices, so I pounded them thin and flat with a meat hammer. Is that OK to do for making beef jerky? Anyone recommend against it? Does it possibly mess with the jerky? I have more irregular jerky meat to prepare tonight, not pounded out or dried yet.
I would have done the same thing you did.Great buy.
A little work, yes.But well worth it in the end.Because you did it!

It's perfectly ok to pound them down with a meat hammer. Or not.
What you would have if you decide it's just too hot today to make jerky leave them in bite size.Nothings wrong with a good chew.I've made bite sized pieces before.They turned out great.
They will take a little longer to to dehydrate.That's ok to.Take notes on the dehydrating times of them.Mine took about 4 hours if my memory is correct.It's been a while.

The great thing about dehydrating is the experimenting part.
I would recommend drying the irregulars last.Keep an eye on the ones you think are ready and pull them out.

Now that I think about it.Do you have a meat grinder?
If so grind it up.Roll it out.Score it with a pizza cutter.Dehydrate it.
The meat will all be in uniform size.No fuss, no muss.

Have fun!
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Old 07-14-2015, 01:42 PM   #37
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I'm not into ground beef jerky yet, I may want to check out that cheaper way to make jerky treats for me. Jerky is still expensive to make. Cheaper than famous brand store bought rawhide, that's for sure. I'm going back to inexpensive roasts on sale. No more flank steak for jerky. $3.99 a lb. roasts, not $6.99 lb roasts. I have a batch going now, London Broil. Sliced with the grain, but very thin. Hoping it being thin it won't me chewy.
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Old 07-14-2015, 01:53 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by Caslon View Post
I'm not into ground beef jerky yet, I may want to check out that cheaper way to make jerky treats for me. Jerky is still expensive to make. Cheaper than famous brand store bought rawhide. I'm going back to inexpensive roasts on sale. No more flank steak for jerky. $3.99 a lb. roasts, not $6.99 lb roasts.
I hope you're not eating rawhide. That's skin, not meat. You know, for dogs.
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Old 07-14-2015, 02:59 PM   #39
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I hope you're not eating rawhide. .
I'm afraid so. I just took out my batch of jerky from the dryer. I had cut it thin WITH the grain. The batch came out chewy. I thought it wouldn't because of how thin I sliced the meat.

I have another batch going...not thin cut slices with the grain but rather thicker pieces cut against the grain. I think thicker cuts against the grain is what I want. That's what I have going now. I think I'll be happier with this batch. It was a lesson learned. Jerky meat cut with the grain...chewy...no matter how thin you slice it.
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Old 07-18-2015, 04:44 AM   #40
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Here's something I've never thought of before for jerky. When you remove the jerky from the marinade, it's still very wet.

Maybe put the meat in a salad spinner to get all the excess marinade off the meat slices before placing it in the dehydrator. I usually place the meat on paper towels to get the excess marinade off the slices. That takes a lot of paper towel sheets and sometimes sponges off too much marinade.
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