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Old 12-19-2003, 11:52 AM   #1
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Can I use the bones from a roasted chicken to create stock?

chicken stock? I know it's prolly a dumb question, but I have some necks and stuff I've been saving, and we go through a couple of roast chickens a week. I thought maybe if I cut the bones into 2 inch or so pieces and roasted them in the oven, I could add them to my normal chicken stock procedure, and get some tasty stock. But is there any flavor left in the bones after roasting the chicken?

Thanks in advance to whomever can help!

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Old 12-19-2003, 02:11 PM   #2
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why don't you try it and let us know? the only bones that i've ever browned to make stock with are with darker stocks (i.e. beef, veal, etc.) so i'm curious to know how it turn out
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Old 12-19-2003, 03:05 PM   #3
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Homemade Chicken Stock

Yes, absolutely, you can do that. Be patient with the bones - you don't even need to cut them up - slow temperature - maybe 250 to 275 all day long, turning occasionally. The idea of roasting slowly brings out more flavor - some recipes say use a 400 for 20 - 30 minutes and I consider that browning versus roasting. The stock that they make is excellent. The best stock I ever made though was by roasting a smoked turkey carcass and then using that to make stock - boy was that good.

Here's how I make mine: (please accept my apologies if I'm telling you something you already know :? )

Add your roasted bones to a large kettle of water being sure to scrape up anything that has stuck to the bottom of the pan too.

Very large onion, cut in half (skin can stay on) and place on griddle or skillet with very little oil and cook it until it goes a couple steps beyond carmelizing - almost burned. Throw that in your stock - skin and all.

I'll take a handful of washed fresh parsley, thyme stems, carrots, celery, and tomatoes (tomatoes cut in half (I usually use 2), if they are slightly "aged" that is even better.

Once the stock comes to high heat you don't want it to boil after that - only slow simmer. As the foam comes to the surface skim off. Just keep skimming and simmering. DO NOT STIR - you want all the dirt and debris to fall to the bottom, which will leave you with a nice clear stock. Don't put a top all the way on it either, keep a little heat escape route. I do mine pretty much all day or all night. It's easier during the day because I can stay on "foam watch" easier.

Once done (and do not salt or pepper either) gently pour into a cheese cloth lined strainer but do not pour the last part that is in the bottom of the pan, that is where the "debris" has fallen and you don't want it clouding your broth.

That pretty much sums it up - if you ever get ahold of a smoked turkey carcass make good use of it (or you can send it to me )

(just about any scraps from any vegetable can be used in this stock - asparagus ends, green pepper ends, just the ends of onion that you use, celery ends, etc. and any herb stems that you are going to throw away).
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Old 12-19-2003, 06:27 PM   #4
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Lessee if I got this right, "Elf....

Instead of throwing stuff into the garbage disposal, toss it into a pot before or after slowly roasting in a moderate oven for an interminable period, then simmering the contents interminably until a stock is formed which will taste good.

Hey, that's simple enough.

Garbage Soup?

:D :) :(
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Old 12-20-2003, 11:35 AM   #5
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Silly oldcoot - NOT garbage SOUP - Garbage STOCK!!
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