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Old 12-11-2007, 04:19 PM   #1
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Questions about Turkeys and Chickens

Can someone who really knows, like a chef, answer these questions:

1. What is injected into the turkeys today? I'm allergic to it and need to know. I can smell it while its roasting and cannot stand the smell.

2. Where can I find turkeys WITHOUT enhanced flavoring? Or a brand. Anything will help.

3. What's the real reason this flavoring is being added to poultry?



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Old 12-11-2007, 04:33 PM   #2
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It's mostly a sodium solution. If it has other chemicals, they should be listed.

There are many chickens and turkeys on the market that have not been pre-treated. Carefully check their wrappers. Bell and Evans is one good brand.

Soaking poultry in a salt solutionis a good way to enhance flavor and make the roasted bird juicier. Many people take an untreated bird and do this themselves at home -- it's called brining.
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Old 12-11-2007, 04:36 PM   #3
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Look for orgnick, free range birds. They should not be injected with anything.
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Old 12-11-2007, 05:36 PM   #4
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Thanks guys! I'm a little more disappointed right now because KFC also uses the new enhanced flavoring as of this summer. I could smell it outside.

I will look up those two brands.
BTW if it's a flavored oil, it can be considered a company secrecy and they don't have to label it such. They wouldn't want us to learn of the new chemical they're adding, I'm sure.
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Old 12-11-2007, 05:39 PM   #5
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jennyema is right - it's basically being brined by being injected with a high sodium solution ... usually either water or broth, but may contain other herbs and/or spices.

The only way to know is to turn the bird over and read the "Nutrition Information" label - if under Ingredients it list anything other than 100% Ch9ickenm or Turkey - it has been injected with something ... and that will be listed. Some brands can come both ways.
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Old 12-11-2007, 05:58 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StefiG
3. What's the real reason this flavoring is being added to poultry?
A sodium based brew for tenderizing (brining) etc. It also act as a preservative of sorts...AND it adds weight to the bird! A gallon of water weighs roughly 8 pounds. At $1.29 per pound (for the turkey) thats over $10.00 per gallon for the water!! So a processor/packer of 10's of thousands of turkeys can sell alot of water which translates into $$$$$

Enjoy!
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Old 12-11-2007, 06:30 PM   #7
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I believe you can go both for the high end and low end product.

Find chickens and turkeys on sale that are dirt cheap. And the inexpensive ones I doubt have had anything done to them. But you can always look at the label, there is some give away.

Then you can brine it yourself or not. Brining birds requires only salt and sugar, and it sure helps a bird in my opinion.

Good luck.
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Old 12-11-2007, 11:20 PM   #8
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Tyson's All Natural Organic skinless boneless chicken breasts have an "all natural chicken broth" injected.

It rockets the sodium per 4 oz from about 52 mg to an astounding 180 mg.

I firmly believe that it is a profit move, and also allows the companies to use lower quality chickens. But I am cynical about these things.

Oh.... they do it to beef and pork now too. I hate the slimy look it gives the meat.
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Old 12-11-2007, 11:43 PM   #9
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Thanks for your responses. I have always loved poultry and I can't believe they would go to this extreme without giving us a choice if we want it flavor enhanced or not. BTW KFC now does this.

When you say high end or low end, could you perhaps tell me the names of some stores at both ends. I shop at Bi Lo's, Publix (their brands inject flavored enhancers). Can't hardly find Tyson or Perdue anymore. I could check out Costco and Sam's. If it's just the natural juices or broth, that's fine. But if says it has added spices, that's not good.
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Old 12-12-2007, 06:45 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StefiG View Post
If it's just the natural juices or broth, that's fine. But if says it has added spices, that's not good.
Why is that not good?
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Old 12-12-2007, 12:32 PM   #11
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Although the terms "flavoring" or "flavorant" in common language denote the combined chemical sensations of taste and smell, the same terms are usually used in the fragrance and flavors industry to refer to edible chemicals and extracts that alter the flavor of food and food products through the sense of smell. Due to the high cost or unavailability of natural flavor extracts, most commercial flavorants are nature-identical, which means that they are the chemical equivalent of natural flavors but chemically synthesized rather than being extracted from the source materials.
These chemicals are made in a lab. They're are not from real plants.
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Old 12-12-2007, 01:03 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StefiG View Post
"Although the terms "flavoring" or "flavorant" in common language denote the combined chemical sensations of taste and smell, the same terms are usually used in the fragrance and flavors industry to refer to edible chemicals and extracts that alter the flavor of food and food products through the sense of smell. Due to the high cost or unavailability of natural flavor extracts, most commercial flavorants are nature-identical, which means that they are the chemical equivalent of natural flavors but chemically synthesized rather than being extracted from the source materials."

These chemicals are made in a lab. They're are not from real plants.
You said "added spices" were not good; that's what I was asking about.

"Nature-identical" above means identical to the natural substance. Even though they're made in a lab, they are chemically identical - there is no difference. What's wrong with that?
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Old 12-12-2007, 01:32 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StefiG View Post
If it's just the natural juices or broth, that's fine. But if says it has added spices, that's not good.

The "broth," so-called, is what most people find objectionable. That's where the sodium and chemicals are.

I'm not sure what could be wrong with spices, unless they are spices that you, personally, don't like the taste of.

All you really need to do is read the labels carefully.
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Old 12-12-2007, 07:42 PM   #14
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Strefi - you seem to have several issues going on ... and are mixing a few of them up to be something else - misconceptions.

1) I don't know why you are bashing KFC other than it doesn't "smell" or "taste" the same as it used to ... that is thanks to the "Food Police" that have forced all such purveyors of fast food to change their cooking oils to reduce trans and saturated fats. The french fries from a major Fast Food place are now just so-so fries because they had to drop the major flavor contribution in the oil for their fries ... beef suet.

2) Yes - you do have a choice in what you get in your chicken/turkey that you buy from the market - turn the bird over and read the nutrition information on the label. If it is anything but 100% chicken/turkey - it must be listed on the label ... by law. If you're really curious about it - you can go out to the FDA website and find the regulations.

3) Added herbs/spices does not mean artifical "flavorings" or "flavorants" - if they are not natural herbs and/or spices or extracts from them - if they are chemistry lab concoctions they will be preceeded by the word "artificial". You can go out to the FDA website and find the regulations for this, too.

4) Brining/injecting ... arrgh .. here is how it works ... the reason for the high sodium content is so that osmotic pressure will draw fluid into the cells to keep the meat moister during cooking ... first the cells draw in the salt until they contain as much salt as the solution surrounding them ... then they draw in water until the salt/water ratio is equal - and along with the salt and water they also draw in the other "flavorings" in the brine (sugar, herbs, spices, etc.) until the osmotic pressures within the cells is equal to that outside the cells. Injecting with a brine, or soaking in a brine, works the same way. When the muscle fibers are heated (cooked) they shrink in two ways - in diameter and in length - by loading them with extra moisture before cooking ... they remain moister after cooking because although they lose the same amount of moisture - they had more mositure to start with - so they have more residual moister in the end.
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Old 12-12-2007, 09:27 PM   #15
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I am with you I do not like some one playing Dr Jekel and Hyde with my food I buy free range Chickens at the farmers mkt. and freeze a bunch for winter use, In a pinch I will buy Certified Kosher chicken and turkey either one has been rated best over the comercial brands. Tysons & etc.
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