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Old 07-21-2011, 10:46 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by TomatoMustard View Post
As for the statement "Turkey isn't supposed to fall off the bone." That's not true. It's just not common practice but that doesn't mean it couldn't be good. Cooking is about trying new things and inventing. So, it's not fair to say that that end goal is incorrect just because it's not the way everyone is doing it

Turkey that "falls off the bone" is, by definition, disintegrated. And it will be very dry and tasteless, having had its taste and moisture sucked out of it and into the cooking liquid.

That might be good to some people, sure. You could "pull" the meat and mix it with some kind of sauce. You could shred it and make enchiladas or a casserole or use it in a soup.

But it wouldn't be very appetizing served by itself. Think of what the chicken is like after you make stock.

Roasting a delicious moist turkey is pretty simple and doesn't take a lot of time. Also, you could just roast a breast, which is even easier.
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Old 07-21-2011, 11:33 AM   #12
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I always made my turkey in a roasting pan on a rack. Sometimes I would use a Reynolds cooking bag. But 3 years ago I bought a Rival 18 quart roaster oven and I've never wanted to cook a turkey any other way. It's pretty much like cooking it in a crock pot. You just prepare the turkey, put it in the roaster, and as Ron Popiel likes to say "SET IT AND FORGET IT!" I poke my external thermometer into the thigh and set it for 165 and turn on the beeper, and if I've stuffed it, I have a second remote thermometer. Then I go do everything else I have to do to prepare dinner without worrying about the turkey until the beeper goes off. If the turkey's done early, the roaster will keep it warm without drying it out.

Oh, BTW, it also frees up your oven for other things like baking the dinner rolls and pies!
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Old 07-21-2011, 05:46 PM   #13
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So lately I've been using my crock pot a lot and it's got me thinking about Thanksgiving. I really don't like turkey and have avoided eating it for the past few holiday seasons. I would like to like it and I started thinking about ways to cook it.

I've had it roasted, baked, and fried and it never really struck a chord with me. My question is, has anyone ever cooked it like you would in a crock pot (eg braising) for a ridiculous amount of time at a super low temp? Bear with me on logistics of this because I don't even know if there are roasters that can accomodate this but what if I cooked the bird at say 180F degrees for 24 to 30 hours in a savory liquid in some sort of slow cooker. What would the end result be? Fall off the bone delicious or water gooey mess?

I don't know enough about turkeys to know if this is a stupid question or not but I'm willing to test some theories here. What do you guys think?
I would guess watery gooey mess as far as the turkey itself goes, however it might work, especially with the dark meat which is fattier. I have a friend that cooks a whole chicken in the crock pot with tomatoes and seasonings, then removes the bones and skin once it's done. He then adds partially cooked rice and green beans and cooks it for about an hour longer. I thought the chicken would end up gross for the same reasons I'd expect turkey to end up gross but it was finely shredded and actually pretty good. Instead of doing an entire turkey, you might try picking up a thigh and leg combo first and experimenting with that. What sort of flavorings/seasoning were you thinking about adding?
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Old 07-22-2011, 09:56 AM   #14
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So that's the answer to the question. Fat. There is not enough fat in turkey to make a long, slow cooking process work. That's the part I was missing in this whole thing.

I concede. I'll go with frying.
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Old 07-22-2011, 11:20 AM   #15
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Brining turkey with herbs will impart extra flavor into the meat. Roasting or barbecuing until the thickest part of the breast reaches 155"F. and removing from heat, let rest for 15 mintues, will give you moist, tender turkey. Smoke will enhance the flavor as well. If it's still too dry for you, insert bacon lardoons into the breast.

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Old 07-22-2011, 06:47 PM   #16
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So that's the answer to the question. Fat. There is not enough fat in turkey to make a long, slow cooking process work. That's the part I was missing in this whole thing.

I concede. I'll go with frying.
Have you ever thought about dicing it up and stir-frying it with other ingredients? Maybe mushrooms, celery, onion, garlic, some black pepper and tarragon? Actually, that sounds kind of good. Hmmm, I might have to try that and I like turkey roasted Thanksgiving style.
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Old 07-25-2011, 09:44 AM   #17
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Have you ever thought about dicing it up and stir-frying it with other ingredients? Maybe mushrooms, celery, onion, garlic, some black pepper and tarragon? Actually, that sounds kind of good. Hmmm, I might have to try that and I like turkey roasted Thanksgiving style.
I really haven't. I just don't really like the flavor of turkey for some reason. I have actually never had it smoked.. that might be a good one to try.
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Old 07-25-2011, 11:56 AM   #18
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I really haven't. I just don't really like the flavor of turkey for some reason. I have actually never had it smoked.. that might be a good one to try.
I usually end up smoking several turkeys every year for pot lucks, weddings, and just because everyone loves them. I use a Webber 22 inch charcoal grill, and maple from the nearby forests, and apple from my back yard. Mesquite also is great for turkeys. Simply prepare the bird as you would for roasting, turss it, place it on a turkey rack, and place it over a drip pan that is placed between divided beds of charcoal, with the wood on top of the glowing coals. Close all vents halfway, and place a meat thermometer in the thickest potion of the white meat, right down near the thigh joint. Put the lid on and let it cook until the thermometer reads 160'F. Remove the turkey to a platter and let sit for 15 to 20 minutes. Carve by removing the breasts and slicing against the grain. remove the winds, thighs, and drumsticks. Clean the meat off of the back, saving the "oysters" for someone special, and serve with sides. I guarantee that you will be a culinary hero.

There is no need to baste or otherwise fuss with the bird after it has started to cook. Just make sure to rub butter all over the skin, and salt before placing on the grill. Oh, and the drip pan needs to be filled half way with water. The juices in the pan, after the bird is removed is amazing and can be used to store the carved turkey in, if it's not to be eaten right away, or it can be made into a gravy or sauce, or added to soups. I also cook up the giblets and inject the resultant broth into the turkey before cooking. If you have brined the bird, that step isn't necessary. In fact, you don't have to do it even if you haven't brined the bird.

I hope this makes turkey pallatable for you.

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Old 07-25-2011, 01:42 PM   #19
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If you feel adventurous--deep fry it like it's done down South, method and videos are online. IMO, deep fried turkey tastes great, but then I like turkey.
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Old 07-25-2011, 04:42 PM   #20
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If all of the above doesn't work for you, eat duck. No one says that to not like turkey is wrong. Eat what you like. If others in your family and friend circle need turkey, make it for the, and something else for yourself. It's all good.

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