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Old 11-15-2007, 06:15 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by corazon View Post
does it make the meat sweet? dh doesn't usually like sweet and savory combined, especially where there is meat involved.
Not really sweet, but you do detect the apple flavour enough. It also gives the entire bird a lovely caramel colour, even the white meat is a darker....still white, but a deeper white, if you get what I mean. If sweet is a problem, and you still want a bit of the flavour, would you consider half cider and half water?
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Old 11-15-2007, 06:40 AM   #12
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or even a Dry cider.
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Old 11-15-2007, 07:35 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by VeraBlue View Post
Not really sweet, but you do detect the apple flavour enough. It also gives the entire bird a lovely caramel colour, even the white meat is a darker....still white, but a deeper white, if you get what I mean. If sweet is a problem, and you still want a bit of the flavour, would you consider half cider and half water?
or perhaps use a dry cider or scrumpy? I can't drink scrumpy - too dry for me.
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Old 11-15-2007, 12:03 PM   #14
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Where do you find those oven bags? I have a similar brine recipe (actually, it might be exactly the same - can't remember offhand) and it calls for two of those bags. If I somehow can't find them, will this work in a covered container so long as the entire turkey is submerged in the brine?
In the supermarket with the ziplocks, etc. Near where they sell liners for crockpots.

Actually, I use those humongous ziplocks now when I brine. You could fit a golden retriever in one (not that you'd want to). They make a size that's perfect for a 16-18 lb. turkey.

Yes, any container will work as long as the turkey is submerged.
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Old 11-15-2007, 12:12 PM   #15
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Thanks jennyema! LOL now I'm stuck on the image of someone coaxing a golden retriever into a gigantic ziploc bag. Portable puppy!

Oh, one more thing. I don't think I have kosher salt (although it's entirely possible that it's made its way to some long-forgotten corner of the shelf). Can I use table salt? If so, how much?
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Old 11-15-2007, 12:14 PM   #16
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You can buy a Ziplock that will hold a large turkey!?!? I've never seen anything larger than 2 gallons.

PS: I could never get my golden into a ziplock. He squirmed too much.
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Old 11-15-2007, 04:59 PM   #17
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Andy

Ziplock makes ginormous bags now. Their largest is too big for a turkey!

Try putting some snacks or a bone in one and I bet your golden would walk right in.


CherryRed

Yes you can use table salt, but use only about 1/2 - 2/3 as much. Should taste salty like sea water.
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Old 11-15-2007, 06:00 PM   #18
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Sounds good. Thanks!
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Old 11-17-2007, 11:37 AM   #19
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I came here looking for just such a thread! I found both Alton's and the below recipe promising. Instead of brining in a bag, I was going to try a large pot, or more than likely a cooler. Since it's cold here (about freezing at night) I was going to put the turkey in the cooler, and put it in the garage over night in the brine. But I am really worried, won't the turkey be salty with one to two cups of kosher salt? I will be buying a Butterball turkey, of course I will check the label to be sure there is no added salt. (uh-oh, editing to say I googled, and found that Butterball turkeys are pre-brined---I will need to find another brand of turkey!)

Perfect Turkey - Allrecipes

INGREDIENTS
  • 1 (18 pound) whole turkey, neck and giblets removed
  • 2 cups kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup butter, melted
  • 2 large onions, peeled and chopped
  • 4 carrots, peeled and chopped
  • 4 stalks celery, chopped
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cup dry white wine

READ REVIEWS (151)


DIRECTIONS
  1. Rub the turkey inside and out with the kosher salt. Place the bird in a large stock pot, and cover with cold water. Place in the refrigerator, and allow the turkey to soak in the salt and water mixture 12 hours, or overnight.
  2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Thoroughly rinse the turkey, and discard the brine mixture.
  3. Brush the turkey with 1/2 the melted butter. Place breast side down on a roasting rack in a shallow roasting pan. Stuff the turkey cavity with 1 onion, 1/2 the carrots, 1/2 the celery, 1 sprig of thyme, and the bay leaf. Scatter the remaining vegetables and thyme around the bottom of the roasting pan, and cover with the white wine.
  4. Roast uncovered 3 1/2 to 4 hours in the preheated oven, until the internal temperature of the thigh reaches 180 degrees F (85 degrees C). Carefully turn the turkey breast side up about 2/3 through the roasting time, and brush with the remaining butter. Allow the bird to stand about 30 minutes before carving.
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Old 11-17-2007, 11:44 AM   #20
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Butterball turkeys are already treated with a flavored liquid. No need to brine.

You can still do it to introduce other flavors, but you should still add the salt to the brine. The salts won't "add up to double the saltiness". The turkey will not get saltier than the saltiest liquid.

So if the Butterball liquid is saltier than the brine, your brine will reduce the salt in the bird a little. If your brine is saltier than the liquid in the bird, your brine will make the bird a little saltier. Either way, it should not be overly salty.

Be sure to rinse the bird off after brining and pat it dry.
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