"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Breads, Pizza & Sandwiches > Yeast Breads, Rolls & Braids
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-25-2009, 08:06 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
bourbon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Georgia
Posts: 125
Bread question

what role does salt play in a bread recipe ? Does it do more than just add flavor ? I'm trying to limit my salt intake and was wondering how it would be if I eliminated the salt. I mostly make the no knead dutch oven bread.

__________________

__________________
Rick's Real Pit BBQ
bourbon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2009, 08:30 PM   #2
Senior Cook
 
Arky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 300
According to the Bread Baking Assoc., and I quote: Unless your dietitian or doctor prescribe a low-sodium diet, keep the salt in your baking recipes at the level called for. Salt has several functions in baked goods:
  • It contributes to overall flavor.
  • In bread, it controls the fermentation rate of yeast.
  • It has a strengthening effect on the gluten protein in the dough.
Without salt, bread rises faster and air pockets enlarge where the gluten has broken, allowing holes to form. Bread made without salt will taste bland. If you choose to eliminate salt, decrease the proofing time so that the large air pockets don't have time to develop.
__________________

__________________
Never trust a skinny chef!
Arky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2009, 08:44 PM   #3
Everymom
 
Alix's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 23,184
Well I didn't have all the scientific stuff at my fingertips, but I was going to post the same as Arky. Nice fast answer there Arky!
__________________
You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it. Robin Williams
Alix
Alix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2009, 08:46 PM   #4
Senior Cook
 
bourbon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Georgia
Posts: 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arky View Post
According to the Bread Baking Assoc., and I quote: Unless your dietitian or doctor prescribe a low-sodium diet, keep the salt in your baking recipes at the level called for. Salt has several functions in baked goods:
  • It contributes to overall flavor.
  • In bread, it controls the fermentation rate of yeast.
  • It has a strengthening effect on the gluten protein in the dough.
Without salt, bread rises faster and air pockets enlarge where the gluten has broken, allowing holes to form. Bread made without salt will taste bland. If you choose to eliminate salt, decrease the proofing time so that the large air pockets don't have time to develop.
Thanks Arky. That's what I was wondering, just how much salt played in the reaction of all the ingredients.
__________________
Rick's Real Pit BBQ
bourbon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2009, 09:58 PM   #5
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Central Virginia
Posts: 3,381
Quote:
Bread made without salt will taste bland.
That's what I was going to say. I forgot to add it to a batch awhile back, and he noticed it right away.
__________________
Practice safe lunch. Use a condiment.
Loprraine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2009, 06:09 PM   #6
Executive Chef
 
mbasiszta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: U.S., Panama
Posts: 2,738
Okay, listen up people. Salt is recommended to control the rate of fermentation with the yeast. But, very important: do not use iodized salt. You can get un-iodized sea salt at almost any grocery store. Iodized salt will kill a good portion of your yeast, which you definitely do not want. Regulate, yes, kill, no. Thought I needed to add this to this thread.
__________________
Happy cooking, Marty.
mbasiszta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2009, 07:05 PM   #7
Senior Cook
 
bourbon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Georgia
Posts: 125
Thanks mbasiszta, I have been using iodized salt now I know why the rise hasn't been what I expected. Still tasted good, just sort of dissapointed with the rise.
__________________
Rick's Real Pit BBQ
bourbon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2009, 07:28 PM   #8
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: CT
Posts: 9
When I make bread and put in too little salt it doesn't taste very good but it doesn't seem to affect the bread creation process. In fact, I have to be careful not to make the salt come in contact with the yeast since it will kill it.

You could very simply make it without salt and see if you like it. If it doesn't taste good, just eat it with something a bit salty like cheese.

Can you cut back on the salt in other places other than the bread?
__________________
infokid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2009, 07:34 PM   #9
Senior Cook
 
bourbon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Georgia
Posts: 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by infokid View Post
When I make bread and put in too little salt it doesn't taste very good but it doesn't seem to affect the bread creation process. In fact, I have to be careful not to make the salt come in contact with the yeast since it will kill it.

You could very simply make it without salt and see if you like it. If it doesn't taste good, just eat it with something a bit salty like cheese.

Can you cut back on the salt in other places other than the bread?

I have cut back in most areas that I used salt before. I really don't miss it anymore. I mainly cut back to help in lowering my blood pressure.
__________________

__________________
Rick's Real Pit BBQ
bourbon is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:53 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.