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Old 03-29-2012, 04:18 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FluffyAngel
Both versions did well. I'm not sure which one was which but - I think the one with bread flour was the one that was more firm & held its shape better. I believe the regular a.p. flour dough spread more. Both were good, had the overall same taste but I preferred the firmer one. Now, I wonder which flour that was? Hmmm...
I would imagine it was the bread flour. More protein means more/better gluten. Higher rise and better shape holding.
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Old 03-29-2012, 10:39 PM   #22
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How long can you leave out rising yeast bread (unrefrigerated) in a 60 degree to 80 degree kitchen? (F) I mean how long until you have to worry about spoilage?
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Old 03-29-2012, 11:30 PM   #23
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Interesting question...

I suspect you would go through some stages, the first being fermentation. Once the food is exhausted you don't have bread dough anymore, you have goo.

For instance, my starter (100% hydration) is a fairly slack dough. Once the food is exhausted it is just a goo, very liquid like. If you let that sit it will form a hooch on top, the alcohols rising up. Then it gets moldy.

I think, in the end you have to worry about mold more than spoilage, but by then you don't have a useable dough.
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Old 03-30-2012, 12:58 AM   #24
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Yeah I think mold would be the problem too.

Another question: what would you gain beyond the first several or dozen hours if you let your dough keep rising?

I mean going through whatever initial mixing and punching down, and then just letting it sit in a bread pan for 12, 24, 36, 48... hours, and then baking. I wonder what a couple days rising would do compared to shorter periods...

So how long until mold could become a consideration. I've never tried it, just guessing: 48 hours?
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Old 03-30-2012, 01:26 AM   #25
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I make a bread dough with
500grams all puropse flour, 250 ml.warm water, 1 teaspoon sugar half teaspoon salt, one and a half teaspoon dry bread yeast kneat it for 2 minutes. Devide it on 3 balls. Open the one put it in the baking pan, spread a teaspoon of olive tapenade, put the second layer of dough on the top, spread another teaspoon of olive tapenade, cover with the 3rd layer, sprinkle with oil and sesame and poppy seed, bake in a preheated oven for 35 minutes on 200 degrees celsius.
You can sprinkle feta cheese instead of olive tapenade.
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