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Old 10-17-2013, 09:19 PM   #101
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Yes I do post and follow three or four Russian cooking forums. It is not that simple, the products that are available there not alwasy available here. When they are available here they are not kosher, most of the time.
Red Mill sells kosher flour year round and King Arthur has it available prior and leading up to the holy days such as Passover. Although I imagine the shipping cost can break the bank. Also most major supermarkets will sell kosher items leading up to the holy days. My store tries to make all ethnic groups happy. They have a dedicated aisle that changes from one ethnic group to the next. It all depends on the next holiday. And it sells Red Mill year round.
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Old 10-17-2013, 10:20 PM   #102
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Flour is not a problem. The other things are like for example for a good rye bread, I need malted rye. And I cannot find it kosher.
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Old 10-17-2013, 11:01 PM   #103
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Flour is not a problem. The other things are like for example for a good rye bread, I need malted rye. And I cannot find it kosher.
Charlie I don't know why, but it bothers me that you cannot find the food you need to practice the laws of your religion. This is the "land of plenty." Have you discussed this with your Rabbi? He may know some sources.

Spike does a lot of work for a Jewish man that you could hardly call even a moderate Jew. Yet he does observe all the holy days. And his wife keeps a kosher kitchen and home. I am going to have Spike ask him where his wife gets the hard to find kosher items. If I can contact her source, perhaps they will know of a source closer to your home area. I am on a mission.
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Old 10-17-2013, 11:17 PM   #104
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Flour is not a problem. The other things are like for example for a good rye bread, I need malted rye. And I cannot find it kosher.
Charlie, I just realized malting is a process and it looks like you can do it yourself. Cooking Finland: Finnish Malted Rye Bread--Ruisleipä

I assume you can start with a kosher rye flour then malt it. I don't know if malting the flour at home makes it not kosher.
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Old 10-17-2013, 11:57 PM   #105
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Charlie, I just realized malting is a process and it looks like you can do it yourself. Cooking Finland: Finnish Malted Rye Bread--Ruisleipä

I assume you can start with a kosher rye flour then malt it. I don't know if malting the flour at home makes it not kosher.
I don't think that is malting. Danish rugbrød (heavy all rye bread) is made in a similar manner. It comes in plain and malted. I think that Finnish author got the wrong word.

Malt is sprouted, dried cereal grain. It is often ground for bread. So, one could sprout some rye grains, dry, and then grind them. But, that sounds like a lot of effort.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malt
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Old 10-18-2013, 10:09 AM   #106
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I don't think that is malting. Danish rugbrød (heavy all rye bread) is made in a similar manner. It comes in plain and malted. I think that Finnish author got the wrong word.

Malt is sprouted, dried cereal grain. It is often ground for bread. So, one could sprout some rye grains, dry, and then grind them. But, that sounds like a lot of effort.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malt
TL, your link describes the same process as the link I posted.
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Old 10-18-2013, 12:42 PM   #107
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TL, your link describes the same process as the link I posted.
I can see the similarity, but malt is from sprouted grain, not from flour.
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Old 10-18-2013, 01:01 PM   #108
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Indeed it the grain not flour. TL is correct.
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Old 10-18-2013, 01:10 PM   #109
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Charlie I don't know why, but it bothers me that you cannot find the food you need to practice the laws of your religion. This is the "land of plenty." :
Hm, believe me bugs me too. But this is not the only land of plenty but also land of demand. And how many people do you think are looking for kosher malted rye? Me, maybe one more somewhere else. Interestingly before I started keeping kosher I would not even be on this forum. I cooked very little. We went out 3-4 times a week. Another thing about availability, in NY I bet I could find a lot more. As the matter of fact I'm surprised I can find as much as I do in MN.
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Old 10-18-2013, 01:15 PM   #110
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You are so right Charlie. Americans seem to have it in their blood to make over ever food our ancestors brought from the old country. We just love to experiment. My daughter-in-law is from Romania. When an American tries to tell her mother how to improve one of her native dishes, Zanna tells them straight out, "I will not bastardize my food just to please Americans. I cook good solid Romanian foods that I grew up with." And she does. She makes these meatballs that I could sit and eat until I get sick. I wouldn't dream of telling her how to change them. Ever time I go to my son's for a holiday dinner, she makes me a pile of them to take home. They are only for me.
People have done this all through history - it's not specific to Americans. When I visited Turkey, the tour guide told us that, when the Ottoman Empire ruled over most of the Mediterranean countries and much of southern Europe (for over 500 years), the army took traditional Turkish recipes with them and adapted them using local ingredients. Thus, Middle-Eastern stuffed grape leaves became European stuffed cabbage.
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