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Old 01-24-2016, 12:11 PM   #11
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I notice all the individually wrapped cod fillets do contain quite a bit of liquid.
I always drain and dry them for several hours in the fridge before cooking.
They rarely shrink more than a tiny bit.
I love cod because I cannot afford Halibut!......LOL
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Old 01-25-2016, 08:32 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
You know that grilling/searing meat does not seal in juices, right? That old idea has been debunked again and again.
Whatever.
You're obviously wanting to go somewhere I do not.
PI
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Old 01-25-2016, 09:37 AM   #13
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All I want is accurate information available to the readers of this site. I thought you wanted the same.

See #2 (everyone but puffin3):
http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/06/t...ing-steak.html
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Old 01-25-2016, 11:35 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
Whatever.
You're obviously wanting to go somewhere I do not.
PI
GG is correct. The science does not support the myth.
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Old 01-25-2016, 12:58 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
GG is correct. The science does not support the myth.
YA RIGHT!

Does Searing Meat Seal In Juices? - Part 2
I'll leave it there.
Tonight I'm 'searing' a nice rib eye steak. I prefer to keep the delicious juices inside the steak rather than on the plate. Tens of thousands of 'Steak Houses' haven't been listening to the 'debunkers'. HAAA HAAAA!
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Old 01-25-2016, 01:20 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
YA RIGHT!

Does Searing Meat Seal In Juices? - Part 2
I'll leave it there.
Tonight I'm 'searing' a nice rib eye steak. I prefer to keep the delicious juices inside the steak rather than on the plate. Tens of thousands of 'Steak Houses' haven't been listening to the 'debunkers'. HAAA HAAAA!
You know as well as the rest of us that steak houses cook have different equipment than home cooks and what applies to them doesn't apply to us.

I guess I have to put this here:

Quote from 7 Old Wives' Tales About Cooking Steak That Need To Go Away | Serious Eats

Quote:
The Reality: Searing produces no such barrier—liquid can still pass freely in and out of the surface of a seared steak. To prove this, I cooked two steaks to the exact same internal temperature (130°F). One steak I seared first over hot coals and finished over the cooler side of the grill. The second steak I started on the cooler side, let it come to about ten degrees below its final target temperature, then finished it by giving it a sear over the hot side of a grill. If there is any truth to the searing story, then the steak that was seared first should retain more moisture.

What I found is actually the exact opposite: the steak that is cooked gently first and finished with a sear will not only develop a deeper, darker crust (due to slightly drier outer layers—see Myth #1), but it also cooks more evenly from center to edge, thus limiting the amount of overcooked meat and producing a finished product that is juicier and more flavorful.

The Takeaway: When cooking thick steaks, start them on the cooler side of the grill and cook with the lid on until they reach about ten degrees below final serving temperature. Finish them off on the hot side of the grill for a great crust. For thinner steaks (about an inch or less), just cook them over the hot side the entire time—they'll be cooked to medium rare by the time a good crust has developed.
Your guy should pay more attention to what the debunkers actually do, rather than what he imagines they do. Kenji Lopez-Alt is a former test cook for Cooks Illustrated. He knows how to conduct a proper scientific experiment, unlike the guy at about.com, who also has stupid things to say about wooden cutting boards. Not Reliable.
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