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Old 10-05-2017, 01:47 PM   #1
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Baking powder--how does it lose strength?

Does baking powder lose strength because it is exposed to oxygen or heat or ???
I came into 2 lbs of it, fresh.

Do I want to package it to use 8 oz a year for the next 4 years, and how do I do that?
OR
Do I want to package it and give away 24 ounces to friends because it will lose strength?

I can vacuum seal, can, freeze, or store at 55 to 60 degrees F. What would you do?
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Old 10-05-2017, 01:59 PM   #2
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I would buy much smaller quantities that can be used up before its expiration date.

I don't know the answers to your other questions of if the expiration can even be slowed or stopped.
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Old 10-05-2017, 02:08 PM   #3
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No, it was given to me from someone that works at a packaging plant, fresh aluminum free, baking powder, free of charge, in return for other kind favors. I just don't want to waste the gift.
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Old 10-05-2017, 02:09 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
No, it was given to me from someone that works at a packaging plant, fresh aluminum free, baking powder, free of charge, in return for other kind favors. I just don't want to waste the gift.
Sorry I couldn't be more help.
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Old 10-05-2017, 02:51 PM   #5
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That's okay. I know a little about how things work, but I know nothing of baking powder. Thanks for trying to answer.
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Old 10-05-2017, 02:56 PM   #6
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I dunno. Since I'd just referenced them in the Good Eats thread I read what McGee and Corriher say in the two books I have handy. Learned stuff but no direct answer to your question. I'm not invested but if I was, off the top of my head, I'd drill down into the King Arthur Flour forums. I've not baked seriously in a long time but there are some serious baking geeks there.
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Old 10-05-2017, 03:06 PM   #7
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According to what I've read, it's humidity that causes baking powder to lose its rising properties; otherwise, it keeps indefinitely. I would divide it into 8-oz. portions (maybe in canning jars) and vacuum-seal it, then keep it in a cool, dry place.

http://www.eatbydate.com/other/bakin...piration-date/
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Old 10-05-2017, 03:49 PM   #8
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What GG said. Humidity is what gets baking powder and baking soda.
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Old 10-05-2017, 06:04 PM   #9
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Okay then, I'm going to vacuum pack them in 4-8 oz packages and keep them in a labeled jar in the basement pantry. Thanks for the help!
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Old 10-05-2017, 06:32 PM   #10
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Done and thanks again. Here's a tip. The vacuum sealer treats the powder like water and sucks it towards the seal and when that happens it can't get a good vacuum and won't seal. So I put portions in zip lock bags and then vacuum packed those individually. Worked great!
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