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Old 01-11-2013, 01:26 PM   #51
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Very interesting and good post.
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Old 01-11-2013, 01:34 PM   #52
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I have made Boeuf Bourguignon using (rump) roast, trimmed & cut into 1-2" pieces in the slow cooker. Comes out great.
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Old 01-11-2013, 03:28 PM   #53
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I have made Boeuf Bourguignon using (rump) roast, trimmed & cut into 1-2" pieces in the slow cooker. Comes out great.
Do you have a recipe for that that you would be willing to share? That's exactly what I was planning on for Sunday, but I am very new to using a slow cooker.
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Old 01-14-2013, 10:51 AM   #54
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Do you have a recipe for that that you would be willing to share? That's exactly what I was planning on for Sunday, but I am very new to using a slow cooker.
JC suggests using a 'chuck' (shoulder) and getting the 'tender' end of the muscle.
I've made 'BB' using all sorts of cuts and IMO the very best is the 'tender' part of the 'chuck'. It has just the right ratio of connective tissue to meat so the pieces have a succulent texture and taste I've never had with any other cut. Not too 'fatty' but not too dry.
Rump roast, IMO does not have enough connective tissue (collagen) to make it 'unctuous'. It's from the opposite end of the animal than the 'chuck'. It's dry even when braised for a long time.
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Old 01-14-2013, 11:27 AM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
JC suggests using a 'chuck' (shoulder) and getting the 'tender' end of the muscle.
I've made 'BB' using all sorts of cuts and IMO the very best is the 'tender' part of the 'chuck'. It has just the right ratio of connective tissue to meat so the pieces have a succulent texture and taste I've never had with any other cut. Not too 'fatty' but not too dry.
Rump roast, IMO does not have enough connective tissue (collagen) to make it 'unctuous'. It's from the opposite end of the animal than the 'chuck'. It's dry even when braised for a long time.
Thanks for the reply. I was getting worried that the rump roast was going to to dry out. In The Way to Cook JC writes to use "stew meat".

Now I'm wondering what to do with that 3 lb chunk of rump roast. It's from a 1/3 of a cow that my MIL gave us. Most of that meat has been less tender than the same cut from the grocery store.

I guess I can make "pounded beef" with some of it and grind the rest.
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Old 01-14-2013, 12:27 PM   #56
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Do you have a recipe for that that you would be willing to share? That's exactly what I was planning on for Sunday, but I am very new to using a slow cooker.
First, cook a few slices of bacon in a skillet & cut it into 1-2" pieces, and let it drain on paper towels. Trim & cut the meat into about 2" cubes & brown in batches on all sides in a skillet. Use tongs to turn the meat. A fork will puncture the meat & dry out. You can brown your carrots & onions (seasoned w/ s&p) if you like. Add it to the slow cooker along with 10 oz of beef broth & 2 cups of burgundy, a bay leaf, minced garlic, thyme, & tomato paste. Add your mushrooms during the last 45 minutes of cooking. The cooking time depends on your cooker. I check after about 4 hours.
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Old 01-14-2013, 12:41 PM   #57
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Thank you Cerise.
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Old 01-14-2013, 12:50 PM   #58
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Quote:
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Thanks for the reply. I was getting worried that the rump roast was going to to dry out. In The Way to Cook JC writes to use "stew meat".

Now I'm wondering what to do with that 3 lb chunk of rump roast. It's from a 1/3 of a cow that my MIL gave us. Most of that meat has been less tender than the same cut from the grocery store.

I guess I can make "pounded beef" with some of it and grind the rest.
I'd do a 'low and slow' and long braise with it. Then I'd refrigerate it and slice it very thin and use it to make sandwiches with and/or served with a tasty gravy, mashed potatoes and peas and carrots. Pretend you are eating at a busy 'truck stop'. I really do enjoy that meal at a truck stop. I know this might sound like I'm a snob but round roasts and rump roasts should be used to make ground beef.
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Old 01-14-2013, 01:00 PM   #59
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Thank you Cerise.
You're welcome. My pleasure. Also, I change it out from time to time. Add some Herbs de Provence if you like, Pinot noir, and/or chestnuts or cubes of butternut squash. It's a departure from the original, but I like to make it my own.
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Old 01-14-2013, 03:20 PM   #60
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I have only just come across this and I think the first picture posted by Dommi35 is shin of beef. Also the picture posted by charlieD, the cross cut shank, looks like what we call shin or leg in the U.K. It isn't often sold on the bone though.

I always use braising steak for bourgignon.
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