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Old 07-12-2005, 03:21 PM   #1
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Brown sugar...

hey y'all

i was watching "liscene to grill" show with robert and i noticed that most of the rubs on his meat and poultry... he used brown sugar and also noticed that some people in this forum does as well... i'm confused why people do it and i was wondering if y'all can explain it this to me... i think brown sugar as an ingredient to dessert type like cakes, cookies, pastry cause its come....

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Old 07-12-2005, 03:28 PM   #2
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Welcome aboard, Mulak.

Many BBQ sauces and rubs contain brown sugar. It's a common ingredient. It provides a balance against the heat of other ingredients. I can assure you the finished product does not taste like a dessert.
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Old 07-12-2005, 03:46 PM   #3
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Mulak, welcome to DC.
A lot of savory items have sweetness in them - check your labels on the back of ketchup and BBQ sauce. It's that little hint that really enhances the flavor of the other ingredients.

PS - I love Rob Rainford on Licence to Grill! He really has some great ideas! Did you see his homemade roasted ketchup? Wow!
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Old 07-12-2005, 04:42 PM   #4
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Thanks for ur replys...i must have miss that eps with the roasted ketchup... Robert Rainford because he used most of his cooking on the bbq and I LOVE BBQ :) smokey hickory flavour! hmmm goood hahah
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Old 07-12-2005, 05:06 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mulak
Thanks for ur replys...i must have miss that eps with the roasted ketchup... Robert Rainford because he used most of his cooking on the bbq and I LOVE BBQ :) smokey hickory flavour! hmmm goood hahah
A lot of great marinades use honey or brown sugar, too. I don't think I've ever made a BBQ sauce without some brown sugar or molasses in it, although you have to be careful how you use such sauces, as the sugar will carmelize and burn very quickly if you cook it too long or too hot. I usually cook the meat most of the way without the sauce (using a dry rub or sugar free marinade), then just sauce it to finish for a few minutes right before serving.
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Old 07-12-2005, 10:26 PM   #6
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Also salt and sugar are 2 very basic flavors/tastes. Everyone is familar with them.

In rubs, brown sugar will blend better (no white specs) in color with the other spices.
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Old 07-12-2005, 10:31 PM   #7
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Didn't I read something on here about umami? Isn't that what the brown sugar stimulates? Searching....
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Old 07-12-2005, 10:33 PM   #8
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The Japanese long ago invented a word to describe the unique effects of seaweeds glutamates on taste: umami. Today umami is acknowledged to represent a separate family of savory tastes that are stimulated by glutamates, similar to the family of sweet tastes that are stimulated by sugar, aspartame, and their saccharine relatives.

There was a thread started by Chopstix on this. I found it very interesting.
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Old 07-13-2005, 12:13 PM   #9
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sugar helps heighten savory tastes. that's why it's added to brines for example.

it also helps brown (carmelize) the meat.
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