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Old 09-30-2013, 10:42 AM   #21
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I think a goulash is a mixture of all kinds of things probably almost like a casserole. Maybe for some people including the author of your recipe, if the recipe turns out more solid, it's a casserole and if it's looser, it's goulash.

We go by the "It was ok, but I doubt we will do it again." rule too.
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Old 09-30-2013, 11:15 AM   #22
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That recipe sounds like American chop suey, which looks like goulash to me.

When I made my recipe for chop suey, I wanted to call it American chop suey, but goulash is not what I make. I finally decided to call it Pork chop suey.

Pork Chop Suey
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Old 09-30-2013, 11:18 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoot View Post
Saturday, Mrs Hoot ventured down the local CHKD thrift store. She returned with three cookbooks she found that she thought I might like and may have some interesting recipes. One of the books its titled "Favorite Recipes of America: Casseroles".
After looking through it, she settled on a recipe for Goulash. I looked at the recipe and said, "That don't sound like Goulash to me." She countered that it is a Goulash casserole (even though the title simply said "Goulash.")
Here is the list of ingredients:
1 lb. hamburger
1 sm. can of kidney beans
1 8 oz. pkg. spaghetti, cooked
1 lge onion, chopped
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp black pepper
1/2 tsp chili powder
1 can corn
Now, in my feeble mind, this sounds neither like Goulash or a casserole.
I would be interested in opinions.
Thanks!

Please note: As I understand copyright law, it is permissible to post an ingredient list as long as I don't quote the method. If this is incorrect, I apologize and will happily defer to the judgement of our wise and sage moderators.
I'm with you on the goulash - not at all like any goulash recipe I've ever come across. Casserole on the other hand is a bit of a broad term. I call any stew a casserole if it's cooked in the oven whereas my mother always called it a stew. without seeing the instructions I couldn't say.

At the risk of offending the Tex-Mex contingency the list of ingredients sounds like a chilli (ducks behind the sofa to avoid flying missiles).
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Old 09-30-2013, 11:35 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
I'm with you on the goulash - not at all like any goulash recipe I've ever come across. Casserole on the other hand is a bit of a broad term. I call any stew a casserole if it's cooked in the oven whereas my mother always called it a stew. without seeing the instructions I couldn't say.

At the risk of offending the Tex-Mex contingency the list of ingredients sounds like a chilli (ducks behind the sofa to avoid flying missiles).
I'm not a chili aficionado, but I've never heard of one that includes pasta or corn. Using beef and chili powder doesn't make something a chili.
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Old 09-30-2013, 11:36 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
To me goulash is an Austrian/Hungarian dish. It's a stew made with beef and paprikas. It's often served with spaetzle.

The dishes Hoot and pacanis described have many variations and is called by a number of names. Goulash, American chop suey and slumgullion are three that come to mind right away.

Hoot, if that cookbook was published in Minnesota, it would be titled Hot Dishes. Minnesotans don't acknowledge the word casserole.
Thanks Andy. I was getting a bit confused. I too thought we were talking about the Hungarian version of goulash which is very yummy.

Why don't Miinnesotans acknowledge the word "casserole"?
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Old 09-30-2013, 11:37 AM   #26
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I'm not a chili aficionado, but I've never heard of one that includes pasta or corn. Using beef and chili powder doesn't make something a chili.
Well, probably not but you haven't seen chilli recipes over here!
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Old 09-30-2013, 12:03 PM   #27
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Yah sure well to make this a truly Minnesota Hot Dish, this would require Not Drain the vegetable cans and cut the chili powder by half. That's way too spicy. Emphasize using a Sm Can of kidney beans, that sounds typical, don't be too exotic or forward. I'm suire I've eaten something like this, though this one looks dry.

I have several of a series of late 1960's cookbooks, Home Economics Teachers Favorite Recipes -- Main Dishes. Lots of casseroles submitted by teachers from across the country. I also have their Desserts and Holidays books both with lots of jello recipes I think they published these and schools sold these as fund raisers.
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Old 09-30-2013, 12:11 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
To me goulash is an Austrian/Hungarian dish. It's a stew made with beef and paprikas. It's often served with spaetzle.

The dishes Hoot and pacanis described have many variations and is called by a number of names. Goulash, American chop suey and slumgullion are three that come to mind right away.

Hoot, if that cookbook was published in Minnesota, it would be titled Hot Dishes. Minnesotans don't acknowledge the word casserole.
I have only eaten Hungarian Goulash in Vienna. It was served with spaetzle and had chunks of beef in it, not ground beef. No beans. Here's a llnk that might be of interest:

All About Hungarian Goulash - Authentic Recipe

Andy, in MN we understand the differences between the words hot dish and casserole. Hot dishes are typically made with ground beef and cream soups and NOT served to company, but you can bring a hot dish to a potluck. A casserole is made with a more expensive cut of meat or another type of meat and can be served to company. There are recipes in MN for tuna hot dish and tuna casserole. I'll leave it up to DCers to figure out the difference.
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Old 09-30-2013, 01:19 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
I have only eaten Hungarian Goulash in Vienna. It was served with spaetzle and had chunks of beef in it, not ground beef. No beans. Here's a llnk that might be of interest:

All About Hungarian Goulash - Authentic Recipe

Andy, in MN we understand the differences between the words hot dish and casserole. Hot dishes are typically made with ground beef and cream soups and NOT served to company, but you can bring a hot dish to a potluck. A casserole is made with a more expensive cut of meat or another type of meat and can be served to company. There are recipes in MN for tuna hot dish and tuna casserole. I'll leave it up to DCers to figure out the difference.
I thought it was because "kasserolle" is the Danish and Norwegian word for a saucepan or other cooking pot. (In Swedish it's kastrull).

We went to a pub in Copenhagen and Stirling ordered "Friedas kasserolle". He was very surprised that it wasn't a casserole, but a yummy dish served in a small, black cauldron.
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Old 09-30-2013, 01:37 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I thought it was because "kasserolle" is the Danish and Norwegian word for a saucepan or other cooking pot. (In Swedish it's kastrull).

We went to a pub in Copenhagen and Stirling ordered "Friedas kasserolle". He was very surprised that it wasn't a casserole, but a yummy dish served in a small, black cauldron.
The casserole dish was the dish used to make the one-pot meals. In the 1950s, these dishes became more popular. In the early '50s, the meaning of the word "casserole" in English changed from the pot in which the dish was cooked to the dish cooked in the pot. My thought about why in the Midwest hotdish could conceivably be linked to the smorgasbord (too lazy to add the diacritic). My grandma's handwritten cookbook for ~1919-1925 has several recipes for hotdishes, none for casseroles. She was first-generation Swedish-American raised in an area that was mostly Norwegian and Swedish immigrants.

If you've ever been to a Lutheran Church supper, a funeral, family reunion, or a barnraising in MN, the woman prepare a variety of dishes and lay them out buffet style, arranging the cold dishes on one table (or two or three), the hot dishes on another table, and the desserts on a third table. I think the use of the word "hotdish" has its roots in that tradition--dishes that were placed with the other hot food on the hot dishes table. Although, there is also the distinction made re: ingredients. Potatoes, cream of mushroom soup (Lutheran binder), and ground beef are typical ingredients for hotdishes. Casseroles are fancier dishes with more expensive ingredients. At least, that seems to be how my family distinguished between a hotdish and a casserole.
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